AMA Dragbike Ceases Operations

[facebook_ilike] Effectively immediately, AMA Dragbike will cease operations indefinitely. Regretfully, today’s economic climate, rising costs and decreasing revenue makes it fiscally irresponsible to continue doing business. The final details are being worked out at this time.

“Motorcycle Drag Racing has been a passion for both of us for many years and we have given all of ourselves to this sport,” said Brandi Neithamer, Vice President of AMA Dragbike. “We knew this year would be very difficult given the economic conditions but we never anticipated it would go downhill so quickly. Scott and I have a tough road ahead of us to close the business, and we hope to receive the support of the community during this difficult time.”

“If there are any parties interested in starting another sanction that will carry on the professional level and values of AMA Dragbike, please feel free to contact us,” she continued. “We will do everything in our power to help you succeed.”

AMA Dragbike would like to thank all the racers, sponsors and fans that have helped support the organization (formerly AMA Prostar) over the last 21 years. We have always strived to hold safe, fair and exciting racing events, and we appreciate all that have helped us achieve that goal.

Best wishes to all in our racing community,

Scott Valetti
Brandi Neithamer
AMA Dragbike

Contact click here


AMA Dragbike is gone, but Straightliner magazine lives on


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Straightliner Magazine Continues despite AMA Dragbike Ceasing Operations

Straightliner is sorry to see AMA Dragbike go, but America’s only all-motorcycle drag racing magazine is looking forward to more time with the many thriving series in the sport. In addition to complete coverage of every Mickey Thompson MiRock Superbike Series event, Straightliner has already begun discussions with the ADRL and Hurricane Alley. So even though the icon is gone, the sport and our place in it will continue unabated.

Our July issue covers the May Rockingham and June Maryland races, and what will now stand as AMA Dragbike’s final event in Montgomery. We’ll have opinions from racing veterans and industry insiders about this latest development in the landscape of the sport and find out where the action is growing. This issue will debut in record numbers at the blockbuster Fast By Gast WPGC Bike Fest at Maryland International Raceway in July. Secure a spot for your company in this landmark issue of Straightliner by July 2nd.

America’s only all-motorcycle drag racing magazine thanks you for your continued support and will continue to deliver the best coverage to the best customers in motorsports!   For more information on advertising opportunities in Straightliner, contact  Tim Hailey timhailey@earthlink.net (718) 554-3866 or Sylvia Cochran sylviac@usridernews.com 478-237-3761

Cycle Sounds® Introduces Series 3 – 3 Inch Premium Sound System

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Lee’s Summit, MO- Cycle Sounds, has recently introduced their Series 3 audio system specifically designed and engineered for the V-Twin market. Each Series 3 Premium Sound System comes complete with your choice of 3 inch bullet speakers (black or chrome), high-powered mini amplifier with wiring harness and mount, handlebar MP3 mount, speaker mounts and all necessary connectors and wires to complete installation. These speaker systems are designed with a patented multiple shim mounting system that easily attaches to 7/8”, 1” and 1¼” bars without any additional mounting hardware. These lightweight bullet speakers produce clean crisp sound, with minimum distortion… even over engine and road noise. Systems work with iPod, iPhone, mp3, Satellite Radio or any device that uses a 3.5mm earphone jack. The Series 3 Premium Sound System works perfect on any style motorcycle.

Ed Files, President of Cycle Sounds has over a dozen patents regarding their audio products and has recently introduced some revolutionary new products by which all others will be judged, including the new water-resistant Bagger AudioTM lids. Ed stated, “We developed this premium sound system because not everyone rides a bagger, but most everyone enjoys music. Now you can listen to music any time and anywhere you ride.” All Cycle Sounds motorcycle sound systems are thoroughly tested under true riding conditions…ensuring you the highest quality audio in the motorcycle industry.

Cycle Sounds, LLC also produces a wide variety of audio components, not just for the V-Twin market, but also for sportbikes, metric cruisers, ATV, UTV, scooters and more. For dealers, OEM’s or distributors that are interested in adding Cycle Sounds products to their parts line up, please call (866) 427-2346 or email them at sales@cyclesounds.com. Check out their website at www.cyclesounds.com.


MV Agusta recalls F4 Motorcycles for Filter Problem

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2010 F4 models recalled for air cleaner problem

Mv Agusta is recalling certain model year 2010 F4 motorcycles manufactured from February 10 through April 19, 2010, equipped with an air filter frame, p/n 8000b4061, which may lift out of position, allowing intake air to bypass the filter. if this occurs, debris may enter the throttle body assembly and interfere with proper throttle operation, increasing the risk of a crash. Mv Agusta will notify owners and dealers will repair the motorcycles free of charge. The safety recall is expected to begin on or about June 28, 2010. Owners may contact Mv Agusta at 1-414-342-4680. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle safety hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (tty 1-800-424-9153), or go to http://www.Safercar.Gov


American Motorcyclist Association supports EPA decision to delay ruling on increased ethanol in gasoline

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ear of corn

increasing ethanol can have negative effects on air cooled engine

The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) concurs with the decision announced by the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on June 17 to delay its ruling on whether to allow the ethanol portion of blended gasoline to be increased from the current 10 percent to 15 percent.

“This is encouraging news because much more research needs to be done to be sure that increased levels of ethanol in gasoline are beneficial, rather than damaging, to motorcycle engines and components,” said Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager.

“The AMA supports the use of cleaner-burning fuels but we are concerned that, if the allowable level of ethanol is raised, it could result in premature engine damage or failure while a bike is being ridden on a highway,” Szauter explained. “We are also concerned about any degradation in performance, fuel economy and rideability that may result from the long-term use of blended fuels with greater than 10 percent ethanol.”

Growth Energy, an ethanol lobbying group, asked the EPA in March 2009 to allow gasoline to contain up to 15 percent ethanol. The EPA had planned to issue a decision by December 2009 but then said a decision would come in mid-2010. The EPA recently said a decision won’t be made until at least the fall because more tests need to be completed.

Currently, pump gasoline in the United States can contain up to 10 percent ethanol, which is used to increase octane, reduce carbon monoxide emissions and provide an alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Motorcycle manufacturers currently only certify their engines to run on fuels that have a 10 percent or less blend.

Increasing the percentage of ethanol could have a negative impact on motorcycle engines, since burning ethanol creates more heat than conventional gasoline. That has the potential to damage air-cooled motorcycle engines.

Also, fuel systems on bikes may be susceptible to corrosive effects of higher concentrations of ethanol in gas. And while ethanol helps reduce carbon monoxide levels in engine exhaust, it can also increase the levels of oxides of nitrogen, one of the components of smog.

“Until studies show that a higher ethanol blend won’t damage motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle (ATV) engines, and won’t make motorcycles emit more nitrogen oxides than are allowed by the EPA, the AMA can’t support any proposal to allow a higher blend,” Szauter said.

The AMA is a member of AllSAFE, the Alliance for a Safe Alternative Fuels Environment, a group formed to ensure that fuels containing ethanol are promoted in a thoughtful manner. AllSAFE is made up of associations that represent consumer and commercial users of ethanol blends, manufacturers of boats, vehicles, engines and equipment, and retailers who sell gasoline and ethanol-fuel blends.

About the American Motorcyclist Association
Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists’ interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com.


Bob Dylan and Ozzie Join Lineup at The Chip

[facebook_ilike]Another legendary musical act has inked a deal to perform at  the biggest party in the world, according to information released by the Buffalo Chip Campground. “Having Bob Dylan play at the Chip is a dream come true,”  said Rod Woodruff, the owner of the iconic Sturgis South Dakota Buffalo Chip campground.  Dylan will perform August 10th.  Woodruff said, Dylan’s performance on the Buffalo Chip stage will be an historic one. He said it has always been the goal of the Buffalo Chip to give its campers fond memories that will last a lifetime and that Dylan’s 2010 will be one for the books and a memory worth pursuing.”

Sturgis music fans have always listed Ozzy Ozborn high on their Sturgis music wish list. He’s an innovator. Others follow his lead.  As the frontman for the hugely successful Black Sabbath and as an unequaled solo performer, Ozzy was the first to have his own hard rock/metal touring festival. His impact on rock ‘n’ roll will be felt for decades to come.   Oddly enough, Jason Aldean will share the stage on the same night with the dark rocker August 12th.  For more info and to view the complete lineup, visit the Chip’s official website.


AMA Team USA to take on world at 2010 Trial des Nations

[facebook_ilike]PICKERINGTON, Ohio — With selections made and the members thick in competition for the 2010 AMA Racing/NATC Observed Trials National Championship Series, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports that AMA Team USA is ready to take on the world at the 2010 Trial des Nations (TdN) in Myslenice, Poland, on Sept. 11-12.

“Trials is one of the world’s premier competitive motorcycle disciplines, with a history and heritage that go back generations,” said AMA Director of Racing Joe Bromley. “The Trial des Nations is a major part of the AMA’s international racing effort, and it is an honor to compete at this event. We’re confident our riders will hold their own and make America proud at this world-class meet.”

The 2010 men’s team — riding the International class this year — will feature Pat Smage, Cody Webb and Keith Wineland. All veterans, these riders were part of the lineup that represented the United States in Italy in 2009 and collected AMA Team USA’s best-ever fifth-place finish in the world championship event.

The Women’s Team, which finished eighth in the Women’s division last year, welcomes back the talents of Sarah Duke and Caroline Allen.

Smage, from Elkhorn, Wis., is a four-time AMA/NATC National Trials Champion and is tied for the points lead with Webb for the 2010 title. He will be returning for his fourth trip to the TdN.

“This year should be good,” said Smage, who will ride a Sherco. “I’m glad I’m on the team this year. We should have a legitimate shot at getting a podium and potentially a shot at the win. I rode in Poland in 2007, riding the 125 line, so this should be a little tougher this year. I’ve had a lot more practice since then and feel a more confident.”

The 19-year-old Smage is a veteran at international competition. In addition to the TdN, he has competed in various world rounds since 2007.

“I have a couple wins in the 125 class and one in the junior class,” Smage said. “It’s a different game over there. It’s more mental than here. There are so many good riders that it’s hard to go in and expect to excel. They have different techniques about how they go about their day, how they ride each section and how much time they take. Here, we could spend an hour in the first section, waiting for someone to go first. There, they go right away and they keep moving. Other riders try to get in front of you. There are bottlenecks. The pace is a lot quicker.”

Webb, from Watsonville, Calif., will ride a Gas Gas in Italy. Wineland is from Fountain, Colo. He is third in the national points chase and will ride a Gas Gas at the TdN.

On the Women’s Team, Duke, from Colorado Springs, Colo., is returning for her seventh TdN, and Allen, from Norton, Mass., will make her fourth trip to the event. Both will ride Gas Gas bikes at the TdN.

The sport of trials involves riders navigating their motorcycles over seemingly impossible terrain. The Trial des Nations began in Europe in 1983 as a way to bring the best trials riders from each country together to compete as teams, and it has evolved into one of the most anticipated trials events of the year. Each competing country fields two teams: a men’s team consisting of four riders and a women’s team consisting of three riders.

For more information on Team USA for the 2010 Trial des Nations team, visit USATdN.org.

About the American Motorcyclist Association

Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists’ interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com.


Former Front Man of Poison to Play Full Throttle

[facebook_ilike]80’s glam rocker, Brett Michaels has been booked to perform at the Full Throttle Saloon in Sturgis during the annual Sturgis Bike Week.  The Full Throttle is also the setting for its own reality show on TruTV.

The 47 year old is a walking miracle, having survived juvenile diabetes,  a wicked car crash, emergency appendectomy,a massive subarachnoid hemorrhage, and just this past May the rocker was diagnosed with having a hole in his heart.   Probably the result of having his private sex life with Pamela Anderson displayed on the internet.

Actually, that was just a lame joke, but Michaels has been through the mill, so to speak, both professionally and personally and like all good bikers, he refuses to allow life to beat him down.

Despite having a brain hemorrhage while on Donald’s Trump reality show, Celebrity Apprentice, Michaels returned and even won the competition.

The Full Throttle shows begin at 8 and are free to the public.


Tips For Staying Cool On Blistering Hot Motorcycle Rides

It’s a feeling that very few non-motorcycle owners can understand.  When the mercury reaches the century mark, the heat comes in waves.  It’s been described in various ways.

“It’s like riding through hell wearing thermal underwear,” or as one woman recently said of her ride,  “It felt like  I was riding with a massive hair dryer blowing in my face.”

Riding in temperatures reaching triple digits can be as dangerous as riding in freezing temperatures.  The beginnings of a heat stroke, as with hypothermia, can affect your judgement and impair your ability to operate a motorcycle safely.

The Warning Signs:

Individuals with high blood pressure, those who are overweight are at a higher risk to suffer heat exhaustion and/or a heat stroke.  High temperatures with high humidity combined with these risk factors and alcohol use or certain medications and the ingredients are all present for a tragic end to the ride.

Symptoms include pale clammy skin, headaches, dizzy, nausea, loss of memory and fainting,  muscle tremors, cramping and being tired and weak.  Red skin with little or no sweating indicates a dangerous level of heat exhaustion.  At this point immediate action must be taken to prevent a heat stroke.

The treatments are mostly common sense, but remember the victim may not be mentally capable of making the right decision.  Move them into the shade or preferably air conditioned space.  Spray water on the person, and get some air circulating around the victim with a fan and have them drink non-caffeinated fluids, cool but not ice cold.

Rinsing with cool water is fine, but do not apply ice to the victim as it will fool the body into closing skin pores to retain heat, making the situation worse.

Stay Cool on the Bike:

It’s not always possible to avoid riding when the temperatures reach triple digits, and even with temperatures hovering between 90-98 Fahrenheit the combination of high humidity exposes the rider to dangerous heat stress.

The best course of action may be to wear long sleeves and or a good mesh leather riding suit, especially on rides where the temperatures reach north of 98 degrees.

Our body is wonderfully adapted when it comes to keeping us cool.   We can cool off a lot easier than we can warm up.

Motorcyclsits however, are at a disadvantage when it comes to cooling because in extreme heat, the wind is not our friend.  Temperatures over 100 degrees turn the environment  around our motorcycle into a convection oven.  Strong winds, even as low as 35 mph, snatches away our perspiration before it has had time to cool our skin, leaving us dehydrated and hot.

Add to that the radiant effect of sunlight on uncovered skin (such as wearing thin t-shirt, tank top or no shirt) and serious sun burn isn’t far behind.  Sylvia Cochran, of USRiderNews says her trips to  South Dakota for the Sturgis rally has given her a much better appreciation for the damaging effects of extended sunlight and 80 mph winds on the face and arms.

“In only a few hours of interstate riding you get a nice ‘farmer’s tan’ and your skin starts to feel really ‘cooked.'”  Says Cochran.  “I started wearing long sleeve technical style shirts that runners wear.  They’re made with a cotten/synthetic blend that keeps sunlight off your skin, but the fabric is breathable so you can feel the sweat cooling your skin as it evaporates.

Cochran adds that she also wears a full face hybrid flip style helmet and evaporative vest on long hot rides.

“The vest helps lower your core temperature. But to maximize it’s benefit it must be worn next to the skin preferably under a lightweight vented or perforated jacket. ”  She said.   “At every gas stop I usually buy two bottles of water and drink one, and use the other to soak my vest before getting back on the bike.”

The stares of disbelief as she slips on a jacket in 100+ temperatures are priceless but there’s almost always another motorcyclist who tells her that they do the same thing.  “I’m more surprised at those riders who don’t understand this will keep you cooler than just a thin t-shirt.”

The bottom line is when the temperature reaches triple digits, try to keep as much of your skin covered as possible and to drink fluids at every gas stop while cooling in the shade or inside the store.  Riding through Hell is never fun, but at least it gives you something to talk about at your next bike night!