D&D “Boss” Slip-ons for Victory Cross Country / Roads : Full Review

D&D recently introduced their new “Boss” slip-on exhaust for Victory Cross Country and Cross Road bikes.  D&D claims to build these pipes on a dyno so we thought that performing a full installation review and then taking the pipes to the dyno would be a good test.  I am fortunate enough to live next to Kevin Cross, arguably one of the best Victory tuners in the country.  Kevin works  at Polaris of Gainesville and after receiving the pipes from D&D, I headed to see Kevin, ready to document the installation, fit and finish and of course the performance of these new pipes.

Fit & Finish
When the box arrived, I noticed first and foremost, the weight. This set of slip-ons is rather heavy. Close to twice the weight of existing stock mufflers. Now keep in mind that these slip-ons have integrated heat shields. You use the front stock heat shields but the back two are not used as the pipe and the heat shield is one unit.

The second thing I noticed after unpacking the pipes is that the welds are very smooth and it seems as though D&D spent a lot of time putting these together. The chrome was blemishes free (none that can be seen after mounting on the bike.)  All of the included hardware is stainless steel with hex fasteners. Each bag support rail is a machined steel plate and held in place by two stainless steel bolts that fasten to integrated threaded holes in the top of the pipe. The engineering of the bag support system is very sturdy and should have no problem supporting the bags.

The slips-ons are available with straight or slash cut tips. I received the 45 degree slash cut version. This tip follows the contour of the saddlebags perfectly. I also noticed that the exhaust fits much closer to the bottom of the saddle bag compared with the stock pipe. I thought that maybe heat would be an issue. However, after riding for an hour, I checked the heat on the bag and really didn’t feel any difference.

Installation
Not much here as the process is very straightforward. Basically remove the stock pipes and heat shields. Mount the bag support rails to the top of the D&Ds and insert the rubber pads from the stock pipes onto this rail. Slide the D&Ds onto the header pipe and secure with stainless pipe clamps that are included. Bolt the end of the pipe to the rear support brackets using the existing bolts from the stock pipe. That’s it. Once the stock slip-ons are off, the whole installation process took less than 45 minutes.

I’ve got to deduct points from the instructions, or rather lack of instructions.  While D&D did a good job outlining the process, there were no pictures or diagrams.  However, as most DYI’er know, once you get the process started detailed instructions with pics are really not essential, but they are a confidence booster.  I’d suggest D&D setup some YouTube installation videos to help make the job easier.

Performance
It’s always exciting to hear a new set of pipes and this set was no different.  I waited like a kid at Christmas once installation was complete. I was expecting loud and deep and, while the pipes do have a rather deep rumble, if you are looking for really loud, then look elsewhere. I can report that the D&Ds tend to blend into the wind noise at 80 MPH and I can now hear my tunes much better. When you dump the throttle, they do wake up and give you a nice deep note that really sounds good.

After a rather quick installation, we were off to Alachua Florida to Polaris of Gainesville for a dyno test.  The Cross Country that we were testing with has the following specifications:

2010 Victory Cross Country
Lloydz VFC III
Victory High Performace Air Filter

… and now the results!

MAX TQ – 108.4 @ 3652 RPM
MAX HP – 89.31 @ 4650 RPM

100 FT LBs TQ @ 2373 RPM
104 FT LBs TQ @ 3000 RPM

The torque curve carries well from 2500 – 4500 RPMs. D&D claims to have designed this pipe for max torque at the lower RPM range as they feel most riders spend the most time at this range. I can attest to feeling an increase in torque at a lower RPM range than any other pipe I have tested. In comparison, the stock pipes carry their max torque in the 4000 – 5000 range.  Also, keep in mind that these numbers are at the rear wheel and not crank numbers.  Most bike manufacturers market their crank numbers.  Rear wheel numbers in my opinion are much more accurate.


Keep in mind that weather can affect the results of any dyno test. Also, we suspect that the aluminum frames of the Cross Country and Cross Roads can retain a good bit of heat. We spent quite a bit of time between runs allowing the bike to cool down to get accurate numbers.  However, D&D claims a 10% increase in power over stock.  We were able to confirm close to those numbers with a fuel controller and the high flow filter from Victory.

Summary
Overall the D&D pipe is a good choice for riders that want a deeper pipe that is a bit louder than what a Victory stage one exhaust offers. The power on the exhaust is good and the fit and finish is excellent. I would have liked these pipes to be lighter but overall I think they are a great slip-on. You always hear that “you get what you pay for ..” Even though the D&Ds are a bit more expensive, you are getting integrated heat shield and tips. If you add up the Victory “Big Mouth tips” and any of the other aftermarket slip-ons currently offered, then the price is in line.

The D&D “Boss” slip-ons are available in both black and chrome finishes. Each is also available with either a straight cut or 45 degree cut tip. Chrome slash cut MSRP – $674
More information about this exhaust can be found at http://www.danddexhaust.com

Thanks again to Kevin Cross and the crew at Polaris of Gainesville – http://www.polarisofgainesville.com

Check out this video of the pipes on a dyno at D&D:

D&D Boss Exhaust Video

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