ice

ICE Your Phone

In less than 3 weeks, tens of thousands of you will be hitting the road heading to Daytona Beach Florida and the opening salvo of spring and summer riding season.

Your bike  is washed, oil changed and ready.  Your hotel and campground reservations are confirmed.  You’re just about ready to pack your bags and throw in the sunscreen.  Is there anything you’ve forgotten?

Have you ICE’d your phone?

It’s a simple concept that started in the UK in 2005.  Put a list of your primary contacts in your phone where police and medical personnel can easily find them in the event of an emergency.

ICE is an acronym for In Case of Emergency.  it could save your life, or at the very least it may help ease a loved ones mind in the event you’re in an accident and unconscious and unable to tell emergency personnel your vital information.

Here’s a worse case scenario. You’re riding to met some friends at a rally across the state.  Along the way you blow a tire and end up on the side of the road.  You’re alive but dazed and unable to respond to passers by who call for emergency help.  The paramedics arrive and you’ve lapsed into unconsciousness.  The good Samaratians at the scene find your cell phone and give it to the EMT’s.  They search for an ICE designation but don’t find one, so they don’t know your blood type, or that you’re taking Plavix (blood thinner) because you had a mild pin stroke in your early 40′s.

Without this information the Emergency room doctor makes a mistake in your treatment which further endangers your survival.   Sadly this happens in Emergency rooms all over this country every year.

If you travel extensively, this ICE designation is vital to your safety and well-being.  Be sure your primary care physician is properly noted and, if you have a medical condition, you can input that information with the ICE numbers.

HOW TO DO IT: Check your phone’s settings.  Many newer smartphones such as IPhone, Blackberry’s and Droid’s have a pre-installed ICE contact.  If so, simply choose the contacts from your cell phone contacts that you want to contact in case you are unable to communicate.  Also, fill out any note section provided with information about medicine allergies, pertinent medical history and blood type.  The easiest way to get your blood typed is to donate blood.  They’ll be happy for the donation and besides the good feeling, you’ll know your blood type.

If your phone isn’t pre-loaded with a dedicated ICE contact, simply add one and input the numbers of your family and friends.  Be sure to inform them they are an ICE contact for you, since it could be quite a shock to have a policeman call with unsettling news.  Be sure to note allergies and blood type in the space provided for notes.

It takes less time to ICE your phone than it did to read this story.  Do it now and hopefully you’ll never need it.

Note- If you have a serious medical condition that emergency doctors should be aware of you should consider carrying a $30 MedMemory medical alert memory card.  MedMemory can store imaging results like X-rays, CT scans, MRIs, PETs and ultrasounds. Also EKGs and pulmonary functioning tests can be uploaded. Medical ID Credit Card USB – 2GB Storage: The Medical ID USB credit card (medical smart card) has bright medical alert labeling that can be identified by emergency health care personnel in the event of a medical emergency. Most First Responders search your wallet and purse right away for any personal and medical identification information. MEDICAL ID PERSONAL HEALTH RECORD USB: The USB connector is recessed in the card and slides out for easy use.


One thought on “ICE Your Phone


  1. Great info. Many forget though that all the ICE contact info in the world will be useless in and emergency if you keep you phone "locked" or "password protected" and the emergency responders can't access the information.

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