Suzuki Recalls Over 73,000 Motorcycles

Vehicle Make / Model:     Model Year(s):
     SUZUKI / AN400     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / DL1000     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / GSF1250     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / GSX-R600     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / GSX-R750     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / GSX1300B     2008
     SUZUKI / GSX1300R     2008-2010
     SUZUKI / GSX650F     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / SFV650     2009-2010
     SUZUKI / VL800     2008-2010
     SUZUKI / VLR1800     2008-2009
     SUZUKI / VZ1500     2009-2010

SUZUKI IS RECALLING CERTAIN MODEL YEAR 2008 THROUGH 2010 MOTORCYCLES MANUFACTURED FROM JULY 2007 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2009, EQUIPPED WITH REGULATOR/RECTIFIER ASSEMBLIES, SUZUKI PART NUMBERS 32800-41F11, 32800-15H10, 32800-05H11, 32800-41G10, 32800-15H00, 32800-18H00, 32800-05G10, 32800-10G10, 32800-05H20, OR 32800-06G01. SOME REGULATOR/RECTIFIER ASSEMBLIES WERE PRODUCED WITH INSUFFICIENT ADHESION BETWEEN THE POWER MODULE (CIRCUIT BOARD) AND THE RECTIFIER CASE THAT CONTAINS A HEAT SINK TO DISSIPATE HEAT. DUE TO INSUFFICIENT ADHESION, HEAT GENERATED ON THE POWER MODULE CIRCUIT BOARD CAN CAUSE THE CIRCUIT BOARD TO DEFORM, AND LIFT OF THE CASE.

THIS CONDITION CAUSES EXCESSIVE HEAT ON THE CIRCUIT BOARD AND UNCONTROLLED ELECTRIC CURRENT OUTPUT, WHICH CAN RESULT IN INSUFFICIENT CHARGING CURRENT BEING PROVIDED TO THE MOTORCYCLE BATTERY. THIS CAN CAUSE DISCHARGE OF THE BATTERY AND CAN LEAD TO ENGINE STALLING AND/OR A NO-START CONDITION. ENGINE STALLING WHILE RIDING CAN INCREASE THE RISK OF A CRASH.

SUZUKI WILL NOTIFY OWNERS AND SUZUKI DISTRIBUTORS WILL REPLACE THE REGULATOR/RECTIFIER WITH AN IMPROVED PART FREE OF CHARGE. THE SAFETY RECALL IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN ON OR ABOUT MARCH 2, 2011. OWNERS MAY CONTACT SUZUKI AT 1-714-996-7040.

Evel” Knievel To Be Inducted Into Sturgis Hall of Fame

The Sturgis Motorcycle Museum & Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the Hall of Fame inductees for 2011.  The Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame is designed to recognize individuals or groups who have made a long term positive impact on the motorcycle community.

Don Emde – Don Emde comes by his passion for motorcycling naturally.  He was born to a motorcycling family in 1951, and spent much of his youth either working in the family’s dealership or tearing up the tracks of Southern California as an amateur scrambler, dirt tracker and road racer.  He turned pro in 1969, and set numerous records with his Daytona 200 win in 1972.  Emde and his father became the first (and so far only) father son pair to win the Daytona 200.  After his racing career, Don went on to become a successful publisher and author.  He currently publishes Drag Specialties Magazine, Parts Magazine and Parts Europe Magazine.

Del Hofer – Del Hofer has been a Harley-Davidson dealer for 50 years, first in Huron, South Dakota, then in Fargo, North Dakota.  His love of motorcycling is obvious through many of his activities.  Del is active in the American Motorcyclists Association and is the longest serving member of the Harley-Davidson Dealer Advisory Board. A long-time AMA amateur racer in all styles of racing, Del also served as an AMA referee and District Congressman for quite some time.  Del’s passion for motorcycling is evident to anyone who meets him.  He encourages men and women alike to take safety courses, get active in riding and enjoy it in a safe and fun way.

Robert Craig “Evel” Knievel – Probably one of the best-known motorcycle riders in history, Evel Knievel liked to live on the edge.  From riding his bicycle at an early age to pole vaulting when he was in the army to playing semi-pro hockey, Evel tried it all.  In the early 1960s, Evel joined the motorcross circuit with moderate success until a broken collar bone forced him to take a job as an insurance salesman.  The insurance business didn’t hold him for long, though, and soon he moved his family to Washington where he started his first daredevil show.  During his career, he attempted 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps, many successfully.  In 1974, Knievel unsuccessfully attempted a jump across the Snake River on a steam-powered rocket – the Skycycle X-2.  Knievel died of pulmonary disease in 2007 at the age of 69.

Michael Prugh – While Michael Prugh is certainly well recognized as a motorcycle designer and manufacturer, it’s his work educating others that has taken him beyond the title of “builder.”  Michael has been involved in many builds for charity and as a competitor.  He took second place two years in a row in the AMD’s World Championship of Custom Bike Building and has been featured in numerous publications featuring various builds.  In 2010, Prugh led a team of students from Western Dakota Tech to build “Method” a true “one off” bike that was auctioned at the annual Legends Ride.  This year, Prugh is again teaming up with Western Dakota Tech, Black Hills Harley-Davidson and the Buffalo Chip to build a bike for the Legends Ride.

Gloria Tramontin Struck – You’d never believe this outspoken 85-year-old woman is the same girl who in 1941 at age 16 tearfully told her brother “I do not want to know how to ride!”  Well, her brother won that argument and she’s been riding from that day until today.  She’s owned 14 motorcycles in her lifetime, has traveled every state in the continental U.S. as well as Canada.  At the age of 76, she took two trips to Europe, traveling a total of over 6,500 miles in 8 countries.  Gloria has been a Motor Maid for 65 years, having joined in 1946 and is the longest member still riding.  She continually encourages women to ride and to be involved.  Gloria is an inspiration to riders and non-riders alike.

Mike & Margaret Wilson – While both Mike & Margaret Wilson have contributed individually to the sport and lifestyle of motorcycling, those who know this couple consider them to be a pair.  Mike was an expert dirt-track and TT racer both before and after his stint in World War II.  Right after his return, Mike bought a 45 cubic inch Harley-Davidson motorcycle as a birthday surprise for Margaret.  Mike and Margaret were business partners in a Harley-Davidson then Honda dealership in Cedar Rapids, Iowa for over 25 years. Both Mike and Margaret have been avid riders and have spent countless hours encouraging others to ride, too.  Known to an entire generation of women raiders, Margaret is a golden life member of the Motor Maids celebrating 60 years this year.  Mike and Margaret both serve on the Board of Directors of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum and continue to work to preserve the heritage of motorcycling through their involvement.

The annual Sturgis Motorcycle Hall of Fame Induction Breakfast is scheduled on Wednesday, August 10 at 9:00 a.m. at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center in Rapid City, SD.

Breakfast tickets are available for a $35.00 donation, tables of eight for $300.00.  Tickets can be purchased through the Museum at 605.347.2001 or on line at www.sturgismuseum.com/cart/

 


Florida Discriminates Against Out of State Visitors with Vertical Tags

Legal or Not? That is the Question

With tens of thousands of motorcyclists ready to descend on Daytona Beach for the 70th annual Daytona Beach Bike Week, the law regarding vertical tags is again at the forefront.

Are vertical tags legal in Florida?  The short answer is yes and no  and the long answer is complicated and depends on who you talk to.

And to make it worse, there’s some argument whether the fine is $60 or $1000 for a first time offender.

Yes, there is a fine because  out of state motorcycle tourists running a vertical tag will not be legal in Florida.

In 2009, Florida’s Governor signed legislation intended to clear up the misunderstanding about vertical tags.   That legislation removed the vertical tag prohibition from motorcycles.

But, the misunderstanding and the legality of vertical tags in Florida lingers on, and enforcement of the statute is hit and miss across the state.

Lee Nelson, a  motorcyclist from the area said “I hate to say it, but it is also rather amusing that, after two weeks of research, the President of ABATE of Florida with input from the Dept. of Safety and Motor Vehicles, the law office of the ABATE Legal Counsel, and motorcycle rights champion Senator Greg Evers, there is no clear and definitive answer about what the Florida Tag Law is in 2011.”

A spokesman with the Troop of the Florida State Patrol responsible for Daytona Beach and the surrounding counties told USRiderNews that motorcycle owners can run a vertical tag as long as they maintain a prepaid toll account in good standing and a transponder associated with the prepaid toll account is affixed to the motorcycle or moped.(Excerpt from Fl 316.2085(3) )

Which has the effect of discriminating against out of state motorcycle owners who are, in all probability, not going to have a “toll pass.”  However, that same officer didn’t know the exact amount of the fine.

Lt. Robert Asbill  of the Florida Highway Patrol said, “I’m not 100% sure what the fine is, I thought it was $1000.  I could’ve swore it was $1000 in the last update the legislature sent.”

Lt. Asbill confirmed that anyone who has a vertical tag without the “toll pass” transponder attached to their motorcycle will be subject to an enforcement action from a Highway Patrol  Officer.

By attaching the wording that the motorcycle must have a toll transponder, Florida Legislators made it easy for law enforcement officers to target out of state tourists because it will be much easier for a patrol officer to determine, by observation of the tag, which motorcyclist is most likely in violation of the statute.

That differs from the stance taken by the city of Daytona Beach.  A spokesperson with the Daytona Beach Police traffic unit, Sgt Haller, left a voice mail message saying that “vertical tags are no longer a violation.”    That message gave the indication that Daytona Beach police, at least the motorcycle traffic officers, do not intend to stop and inspect motorcycles to determine if a “toll-pass” transponder is attached.

What does all this mean for those owners of custom bikes with vertical tags?

If you’re from Florida and you have a toll pass transponder on your bike you’re 100% legal.  If you’re from Florida and don’t have a toll pass you can probably skate by without being stopped because absent of some other reason to stop you, the odds are good that law enforcement won’t stop you to check for the transponder.

But, if you’re from out of state and have a vertical tag, you’re a sitting duck for the Highway Patrol and any other law enforcement officer.  By having an out of state vertical tag you have provided probable cause to be stopped for no other reason than to inspect your bike to see if you have a toll transponder.

After that, whatever violation or evidence uncovered is, in all probability, admissible in court.

To read the entire statue concerning tag display in Florida Click here,