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Wyoming Man Waited 44 Years to buy a motorcycle; Dies 3 Miles After Leaving Dealership

o-BARRY-STRANG-570Barry Strang told his wife when they got married he wanted a motorcycle.  His wife Pam vetoed the idea that year and every year afterwards for 38 years saying “they’re too dangerous.”   When Barry turned 59, and being semi-retired he told his wife, “it’s time.  It’s on my bucket list.”  His wife gave in but told him she wouldn’t be riding with him.

The Star Tribune reports on June 28th, Strang went to pick up his Harley from Lander’s HD near Casper Wyoming.  His wife dropped him off and went to a nearby furniture store to check on quilt she had ordered.  The couple planned to meet later at a nearby casino.   Barry posted a photo of the bike on his Facebook page and wrote”"44 years finally got one :)”

But, Barry never made it.

Just three miles after leaving the dealership, Strang was along side a tractor trailer, and for unknown reasons struck the side of the rig and was thrown underneath, and was killed instantly.

His wife heard the sirens and said she knew it was her husband.  ”I felt him.”  Despite her loss, Pam Strang holds no bitterness  or resentment at the cruel irony.  She told reporters her husband lived his life to the fullest and died living life to the fullest, she said.

“It was something he wanted his whole life,” Pam said. “It’s like my son said, ‘Dad went out with the biggest smile on his face.’”

 

25 thoughts on “Wyoming Man Waited 44 Years to buy a motorcycle; Dies 3 Miles After Leaving Dealership


  1. Take heart. He died in Wyoming on a Harley, where He wanted to be doing what He wanted to do. To many of my friends have gotten 'C' and died in bed in a Nursing Home. Ugh!


  2. Everyone's talking about how a rider needs to take a class, but in this case he struck the Rig and it is unsure why. We don't even know if he took a riders class or not, but from the way it sounds it was sadly his fault. The fact is being three miles from the dealer just says it was his time. One could argue had he gotten a bike all those years ago he would still be alive. I had a friend in high school whos dad took him to get a new ninja. It had been raining and the roads were just a little wet and on the way home he lost traction and dumped the bike. He broke his leg, some ribs and a collar bone. In the end it turned out that a summer time new higher who was hired to clean the bikes had used armor all or something similar on the tires to prep it for him to take it home and nobody relized what he had done. My buddy had grown up on two wheels he got his first dirt bike when we were still in elementary school. The fact his you never know when it's your time, and if mine comes while I'm on two wheels then so be it, but I've lost more friends while they were in cars then all the ones that ride who are alive wich is a lot.


  3. well first of all riding a heavy bike like a Harley they don't handle very good anyway , second not doing a course would of helped


  4. Brother in law waited for years to get a brand new fishing boat. First time out, alone, and they found him floating next to the boat in a lake. Accidents occur. They were both doing what they wanted to do. Sad but it happens.


  5. Yes here in Florida if you show a license they will put you on anything you want , used to be you could buy a bike and they would give you a pass for there motorcycle school riding course. But there are some real idiots out there , after riding for 40 years every so often someone does something incredibly stupid and skill with a lot of luck manages to keep me upright ..


  6. My ex worked as a loan officer at a local bank and he felt terrible when two teenagers were killed on the motorcycles they had borrowed money on. The fathers of both boys had co-signed the loans.


  7. I have been riding for 47 years but took a break for a while when i was overseas. i took an MSF course to get the cobwebs off. We had only two new riders in the group, most were highly experience riders. MSTA , the organization i am in http://www.ridemsta.com has a MAP or Member Assistance Program where we pair up a new rider with an experience rider to get them up to speed at their pace. It greatly increases their capabilities and comfort level. I am working with one rider in the MAP program now. I would recommend both for a new or a rider coming back into riding from a layoff. Perhaps that will reduce this type of tragedy.


  8. If you are afraid to ride then don't. If you are a rider then ride. Riders will know what i mean.
    And yes, it is a shame the guy went out so fast- a little preparation might very well have saved his life and a lot of grief for his friends and family.


  9. Yes a rider training course would have helped. It may have given him enough knowledge not to take the busy streets home for the first time on the bike. This story sounds like a verse from an Alanis Morrisett Song……. isn't ironic…..


  10. The poor guy might have had a heart attack! usually truckers are extremely responsible drivers and look out for others. Now saying that I had a truck pull up on the side of me today at a stop light and his trailer almost tipped over on its side on my car! But I agree with everyone that says he should have taken an MSF course prior to getting on, this is the problem with a lot of dealers, sell that bike and who cares if the person has an endorsement.


    • We do not know that he did not take the MSF or similar rider's course, do we?

      In any event, if he was riding alongside a rig, that was mistake #1, I would never "ride alongside" a rig, there is just too much going on with wild air flows and such, easy to get swirled and affected by the air currents on box rigs and such.


    • The trailer almost tipped over "at a REDLIGHT" ???? Did all 4 tires on that side of the trailer go flat at the same time ?? This sounds VERY strange to me!


  11. We just had a close call this past weekend was exiting one freeway to the next and traffic came to a complete stop at about 65 mph. The car in front of me took the right side and gave me room to stop. I braked as hard as I could without losing control but it was not enough. I noticed the lane on my left was open so I leaned super hard left and just missed the bumper of the van in front of me. There was another biker in the left lane and gave me a thumbs up as he went by me. I owe it to my 35+ years riding to make it out of that one. i started on a 165cc dirt bike then up to a 350cc to a 650cc and now ride a 800cc.


  12. I rode a Mo-Ped in my early teens, had a trail bike(Ossa 250) in my late 20s early 30s and didn't ride again until last year @age 69. After a year of riing my 2012 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 Classic LT I can tell you I'm thankful to still be alive. Oh, I've ridden with more than just a little extra care…never ridden in the dark or more than two miles in the rain. Why should I? I'm retired, nowhere to go in a hurry, and can't think of a reason to make this activity I love any more dangerous than it is. Slow & easy does it for me….gets me there….and BACK! Oh, I've logged over 18,500 miles since April 2012.


  13. This is so sad and all to often …I myself 2 days ago got rear ended while rideing my ultra classic as I was slowing down at a stop light.The car behind me was a 17 year old texting on her phone and didn't notice all traffic was almost at a stop.I made a split second choice to take the ditch insted of the car in front of me,I rode the ditch long enough to stedy the bike then drove back up onto the street and parked. If it wasn't for the 35 years of rideing experience under my belt ,I know that could have been my life!!! I think any new rider today that is not experienced should go through a rideing course because to much can happen when everyone you see now is on the phone or texting or watching videos while there driveing. MAY HE NOW REST IN PEACE!!!


  14. This is unbelievably sad … I just wonder if it could have been avoided if he had gone through beginning rider training or had passed a state motorcycle endorsement program. Not all people are meant to be riders…that's why everyone should go through a riding course first and see if it is meant to be. RIP


  15. This is sad, but so often true. It happened at a shop where I was working as a mechanic many years ago. I un-crated and prepped a brand new bike for a customer, and he was killed on his way home riding his dream. Although it can be a hassle rider training should be a ust for new riders. :(

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