Riders Discount Racing Makes History Becoming First Triumph To Win Daytona From Pole Position

Daytona-200-winner-Danny-EslickDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (March 15, 2014) – Danny Eslick and the #69 Riders Discount Racing team made history by becoming the first Triumph team to win the Daytona 200 from the pole position. Eslick is the first Triumph rider to win the race since Gary Nixon in 1967 and the pole position since Paul Smart in 1971.

“Gary Nixon was the last to win this race on a Triumph so this is pretty special. It doesn’t get much better than that,” said Eslick. “Whether I led out of the chicane or if I was fourth out of the chicane I knew I could lead at the stripe. Hats off to the Riders Discount crew for an awesome motorcycle.”

Eslick, of Broken Arrow, Okla., led 44 of the 200-mile race’s 57 laps. His margin of victory was an incredible 10.975 seconds.

“Pit stops for the Daytona 200 are the most important thing,” said the two-time AMA Pro Daytona SportBike champion. “You can’t have bad stops and we had great pit stops.”

“Danny and the Riders Discount team ran an incredible race. It was absolutely amazing to watch them make history,” said Greg Heichelbech, CEO of Triumph North America. “In addition to becoming the first Triumph to win the Daytona 200 from the pole, four of the top ten are Triumphs. Congratulations to all of the Triumph riders and teams for a great race at Daytona.”

A Triumph previously won the Daytona 200 three times. Don Burnett won in 1962, Buddy Elmore won in 1966, and Gary Nixon won in 1967. The first Triumph Daytona production motorcycle appeared in 1967, the Tiger T100R Daytona, as a tribute to Elmore’s victory.

This is the third time that a Triumph won the pole for the Daytona 200. Gene Romero was fast qualifier in 1970 with his 750cc Triumph Trident, and Paul Smart backed it up in 1971.

Four of the top ten finishers rode the Triumph Daytona 675. They include:

#69 Danny Eslick, Riders Discount Triumph

4. #50 Bobby Fong, Latus Motors/Castrol/Triumph

7. # 68 Luke Stapleford, Profile Racing

10. #15 Steve Rapp, D&D Cycles/Castrol/Triumph

15. #42 Kenny Riedmann, RRM/Castrol/Triumph

24. #71 Lee Farmer, Apex Race Services

29. #21 Elena Myers, Apex Manufacturing/Castrol/Triumph

31. #40 Jason DiSalvo, Sportbike Track Time/Castrol/Triumph

After 40 Year Absence, Triumph Returns To The Pole At Daytona

1TriumphThree Of The Top 10 Qualifiers Are Riding Triumph’s Daytona 675

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (March 14, 2014) – Two-time AMA Pro Daytona SportBike champion Danny Eslick and the #69 Riders Discount Triumph team won the pole position for the 73rd running of the Daytona 200 at Daytona International Speedway. It was the first time a Triumph won the pole for this prestigious race in 43 years, when Paul Smart rode a Triumph Trident 750 in 1971.

“Winning the pole at Daytona is always special, but this one is really sweet since it’s the first Daytona 200 pole for Triumph since 1971,” said Eslick. “Everything just clicked with the bike, the team, and working the draft. It was a smoking hot lap for sure.”

The fastest lap Eslick turned in with his #69 Triumph Daytona 675R was 1:49.292, nearly three-quarters of a second faster than the second place qualifier. His top speed was 182.629mph on the 675cc machine.

“Congratulations to Danny and the Riders Discount team for their achievement, and to all of the Triumph riders and teams,” said Greg Heichelbech, CEO of Triumph North America. “It’s a great feeling to see such a strong showing of Triumph’s at Daytona. We’re looking forward to a great race.”

This is the third time that a Triumph won the pole for the Daytona 200. Gene Romero was fast qualifier in 1970 with his 750cc Triumph Trident, and Paul Smart backed it up in 1971. While the machines that Eslick, Smart and Romero rode are separated by more than 40 years of technology, all three machines feature Triumph’s signature inline triple engine.

Jason DiSalvo, the 2011 Daytona 200 winner, qualified fourth with his #40 Sportbike Track Time/Castrol/Triumph.

“We had a solid day and the team’s really pumped up about the race tomorrow,” said DiSalvo. “It’s fantastic that so many Triumph’s are in the top ten today. I think we’re going to see even more Triumph’s in the top ten tomorrow during the race.”

Qualifying seventh is British Supersport competitor Luke Stapleford of Leicestershire, England. Stapleford and his # 68 Profile Racing team traveled to Daytona because “This is a nice chance to get in a bit of riding before the British Supersport season.” Stapleford continued, “The race distance is quite difficult mentally. A top six is the aim in the race and I’d class that as a job well done.”

There are six other Triumph riders in the Saturday, March 15, race at Daytona International Speedway. Those riders and their qualifying positions are:

12. #50 Bobby Fong, Latus Motors/Castrol/Triumph

19. #21 Elena Myers, Apex Manufacturing/Castrol/Triumph

21. #15 Steve Rapp, D&D Cycles/Castrol/Triumph

23. #42 Kenny Riedmann, RRM/Castrol/Triumph

39. #71 Lee Farmer, Apex Race Services

40. #62 Shaun Summers, D&D Cycles/Castrol/Triumph

A Triumph has won the Daytona 200 three times. Don Burnett won in 1962, Buddy Elmore won in 1966, and Gary Nixon won in 1967. The first Triumph Daytona production motorcycle appeared in 1967, the Tiger T100R Daytona, as a tribute to Elmore’s victory.

Watch the Daytona 200 live at the newly launched fanschoice.tv. Pre-race ceremonies begin at 12:00pm EST and the race at 1:00pm EST.

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2014 Triumph Thunderbird Commander and LT Ride Review

wild ones

by: Scott Cochran
photos by: Alessio Barbanti, Paul Barshon, Tom Riles & Freddie Kirn

March 6, 2014: Maybe I was surprised because Southern California wasn’t on my motorcycle riding radar. Yet here I am, just north of downtown San Diego on Highland Valley Road, tearing past orange groves and palm tree farms, grinding the floorboards on this 2014 Triumph Thunderbird Commander less than 15 minutes from urban lunacy.

This past February, while the rest of the country was caught up in the grip of the latest “polar vortex” yours truly joined a select group of moto-journalists for Triumph’s world press launch in balmy Southern California.

It was hard not to feel sorry for the rest of my motorcycle riding buddies on the East Coast.

We’d seen images of the new Thunderbird Commander and Thunderbird LT when the bikes were unveiled at EICMA in Italy in November and were anxious to throw a leg over each to see how the “on paper” improvements affected the real world riding experience.

Now those statistics were becoming real to me as I wound through the Anza-Borrego Desert and up and over Palomar Mountain, pausing to take in the view of Salton Sea, the largest lake in California.

Sitting in the pre-ride briefing, waiting on the presentation to start, I find myself pondering the history of this legacy marque.

both bikes

It’s easy for the American “biker” to overlook this brand, especially the segment that leans towards Milwaukee iron.

Part of the reason is Triumph abandoned the “lifestyle” buyer years ago and (for better or worse) concentrated its efforts on the “performance” market.

Blame it on economics, or stubborn British management, but either way the brand that “invented biker attitude” with Marlon Brando in the movie The Wild Ones has been relegated to the sidelines while others cashed in on the hard core biker lifestyle as it grew into the largest percentage of North American motorcycle sales.

Upstarts like Victory Motorcycles and newly revived Indian have made some headway in courting the Harley rider, Triumph hasn’t had much success in infiltrating that segment.

So in 2010, when Triumph tapped Harley-Davidson and Buell veteran, Greg Heichelbech, as its North American CEO, observers expected the day would come when the Brits would shift the styling of their cruisers to resemble the “lifestyle” market that exists in America today.

That day has arrived.

 

T_Symbol_Standard_BlackOnWhiteMany people forget that In World War I, Triumph produced more than 30,000 motorycles for the Allies, the majority of those being the Model H, also known as Type H, or the “Trusty Triumph.”  Powered by a 499cc air cooled single cylinder, It was the first Triumph which did not have pedals making it a “true” motorcycle.  It is also considered by many to be the first “modern” motorcycle.  

Standing in front of a room full of American motorcycle journalists, Simon Warburton, product manager for Triumph set the tone when he said, “We believe we have a credible alternative to Harley-Davidson.”

Greg Heichelbech CEO of Triumph America followed that up when he stood up and the first words out of his mouth was “Triumph’s Back! And we’re getting back to our roots and the things we did in the 50′s, 50′s and 70′s.”

Heichelbech went on to explain, “The Thunderbird was the bike that put Triumph on the map and helped us become the number one import brand in the 50′s and 60′s” (when “biker” became synonymous with the bad boy image)

But a lot has changed since the 1960′s, besides the size of the engine. The early Tbirds boasted a class leading 650 cc motor and a seat that, while comfortable for its time, would be considered torture today. And we won’t even talk about drum vs disc brakes. Yes a lot has changed and it’s not lost on the Brits as Warburton confided later. “We’re not trying to be Harley-Davidson, but we think this bike will appeal to those riders who want performance, laid back styling and aggressive handling.”

After a couple of hours saddle time on both bikes, I can safely say the engineers in Hinckley hit their bulls-eye.

T_Commander_static035

Rather than replace the previous iterations, the 2014 Commander and LT are new additions to the T-Bird family and are fitted with the upgraded power plant making these the largest parallel-twin (1699 cc/103 cu in) in the world, producing 93 horses and 146 fp of torque, enough to satisfy even the most aggressive of riders.

Momentum isn’t just for sports teams, and as Sir Issac taught us; The momentum of a moving object increases with its mass and its speed. The heavier the object and the faster it is moving, the greater its momentum and the harder it is to stop. Both models are heavy cruisers, but with the LT (which stands for “light tourer” weighing in just south of 750 lbs, add a couple riders and gear and you’ve got close to a half a ton of accelerated momentum. Both models come from the factory with ABS standard equipment. The front brakes are twin floating 310mm disc brakes with 4 piston calipers and the rear brakes are single 310mm disc with Brembo 2 piston floating calipers.

Thankfully, the ABS on the Commander model I rode performed flawlessly. Since this was a worldwide launch, the Triumph representative leading the group had been on this same route 10 or 12 times in the last two weeks. He knew it like the back of his hand. Ahead of me was Bruce Steever from MCN who has the chops to hang with most anyone on the track and is local and has ridden the area numerous times. Behind me is Mike Vaughn, former CEO of Triumph, also a sport bike guy and who lives (literally) on the route we were riding.

While I’m not the fastest on track days, (hell, who am I kidding…I don’t try to ride on the track!) this was not the best place to be as a flat land touring guru, trying desperately not to be the “slow guy.”

So the inevitable was bound to happen. I came in way too fast and overcooked some of the more tortuous turns on the Mesa Grande highway near Lake Henshaw and grabbed a little too much brake lever.
On any other non ABS model, the result would’ve been ugly. Lowside get off at best, high side flip over at worst. But thankfully the only drama was a few chirps from the tires as the modulators kicked in and I was able to slow enough to lean over and stay in my lane without laying the bike completely down.
Here’s as good a point as any to mention the lean angle of both bikes. With a seat height of just 27.5 inches, both the LT and Commander are low slung and easy to maneuver at low speeds and parking lot dances. However, that becomes disadvantageous out on the twisties as the floorboards touch down way too early.

T_Symbol_Standard_BlackOnWhiteMarlon Brando rode a 1950 Thunderbird 6T in the movie The Wild Ones and in 1955 Ford licensed the Thunderbird name from Triumph for a new luxury car eventualy producing 4.4 million units, which ended in 2005.

 

However, the slide rule society at Triumph knew this would be an issue so they mounted wear plates under the boards which absorb the road rash instead of damaging the more expensive chrome and painted parts. Still it’s a bit disconcerting the first few times they scrub and downright sphincter tightening when you’re fully leaned over, heading into the oncoming lane and having to choose whether to stand up and apply the brakes or keep leaning and hoping that you don’t bounce into oncoming traffic.

My takeaway from that is this; know your limitations and those of your bike. Luckily I didn’t trash the Commander or lose any skin, and I didn’t make the same mistake the next day on the LT.

SUSPENSION

Simon Warburton made a point to stress that besides providing smooth acceleration and braking, Triumph engineers were keen on improving the comfort and handling of these new Thunderbird’s. With an all new frame and swing-arm, designers included the engine as a stressed member, which reduces the flex in the chassis and gives it a more stable footprint.commander and details

While the rake and trail are slightly different on the two models, the handling characteristics are essentially the same. Although almost every journalist I spoke to agreed that the Commander is the “sportier” of the two. Chalk some of that up to the extra weight *(saddlebags, seat, luggage rack, wheels) and that big piece of Plexiglas out front on the LT and the rest to the slight difference is in how the new shocks affects the bikes.

Out on the rear, Triumph installed a pair of adjustable dual rate spring loaded shocks. Designed to offer a cushy ride on long trips, the 4.1 inches of travel easily soaked up the occasional broken asphalt potholes and all too often irregular bumps on our two lane travel through the So Cal desert. In the mountain twisties, I did find myself wishing for a slightly stouter setup. Thankfully there is a five position preload manual adjustment on each shock when you need a little something stiffer.

tshirt

The handlebars on the Commander provide for a more “forward” lean than on the LT. This works perfect without a windscreen. I dislike cruisers which place the rider in a more upright position and forces them to “hang on” to the grips when going sans windscreen. Very uncomfortable and dangerous.

On the Commander, that little tweak to the position of the bars made all the difference in comfort and stability from other “naked” cruisers.

SEAT OF THE PANTS

Then there is the seat. It’s usually the first thing we all want to change out when we buy a stock bike from the showroom floor. To paraphrase a famous politician (and take it entirely out of context,) when thinking of the seat on these new T-Birds “The butt stops here.” Ok, I hear the collective groan from the peanut gallery but I needed something witty to highlight how impressive this new seat is.

Consider that Triumph designers created a seat with three layers of different foam densities and a lumbar support (almost 4 inches total) and kept the seat height under 28 inches, I’d wager the seat isn’t going to be the first thing you’ll want to change. Granted, we only rode for a little more than an hour on our longest stretch in the saddle, so maybe I shouldn’t be bragging on the comfort just yet. However, by the time you read this we will have an LT in the office garage and will have spent 6 or 7 hours straight in the saddle. I’ll let you know if it performs as good as it looks.T_LT_details016

Both the Commander and the LT are available in two tone color schemes. The LT’s Caspian Blue/Crystal White paint is the best looking (in my humble opinion) and it also comes in Lava Red/Phantom Black. (Retail $16,999) The Commander comes in Crimson Sunset Red/Lava Red and Phantom Black/ Storm Grey. (Retail $15,699)

We’ll have a long term test on the LT in the next few months.

Triumph purists may decry the new direction the company has taken with these T-Birds, but they shouldn’t.

The brand isn’t abandoning its performance heritage, the Brits have simply created two cruiser models under $17k with modern performance yet comfortable and classic styling,

If anything, Triumph fans should be cheering. The Wild Ones are back!

(more static and detail photos in the photo gallery after the obligatory group picture.

That's the Salton Sea in the background.

That’s the Salton Sea in the background.

 

Castrol Rocket Aims for World Land Speed Record

 

Salt from the famous Bonneville Flats on the Castrol Rocket tire

Salt from the famous Bonneville Flats on the Castrol Rocket tire

ATLANTA – Once proclaimed the king of the Bonneville Salt Flats, Triumph Motorcycles is back at work on its latest innovation, this time with the world’s most technologically-advanced streamlined motorcycle – the Hot Rod Conspiracy/Carpenter Racing Castrol Rocket.

The Castrol Rocket is unique in that it’s a 1,000-horsepower motorcycle built like a fighter jet. The project underwent its first testing in August 2013 at the famed Bonneville Salt Flatsin northwestern Utah with the goal of an eventual 400-mph-plus record-breaking run. The current American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) and Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) motorcycle land speed record is 376.156 mph, set in 2010, by Rocky Robinson with the Ack Attack streamliner.

Castrol has been actively involved with land speed racing on multiple platforms across the globe since competitors started running at the Bonneville Salt Flats in 1914,” said Rob Corini, Brand Manager, Castrol Motorcycle and Powersports Products. “The Castrol Rocket personifies our heritage as a performance brand, with an incredible balance of power and aerodynamics, and is capable of amazing speeds. It’s the ultimate symbol of performance.”

A shared passion for land speed racing brought aerodynamic engineer Matt Markstaller, engine builder Bob Carpenter and Daytona 200 winner Jason DiSalvo together. The cross-country team – from Oregon, New Jersey and Alabama respectively – quickly discovered a shared interest to create and race the world’s fastest motorcycle. The Castrol Rocket is their labor of love – an homage to the high-

Jason DiSalvo is set to attempt to capture the land speed record on the Rocket

Jason DiSalvo is set to attempt to capture the land speed record on the Rocket

performance heritage of Castrol and Triumph.

“Land speed racing is the purest form of motorsport. It’s about bringing all of your ingenuity, resources and determination together for a constant battle against the elements,” said pilot Jason DiSalvo. “The salt surface has little traction. The wind pushes against you from every side. But what’s really special about Bonneville Land Speed Racing is the people. The conditions are so challenging that for the past 100 years, racers with little else in common have banded together to support and encourage each other to become the world’s fastest.”

The Triumph name has been synonymous with speed since its four record-breaking motorcycle records with Devil’s Arrow, Texas Cee-gar, Dudek/Johnson and Gyronaut X1. From 1955 to 1970, with the exception of a brief 33-day period, Triumph was “The World’s Fastest Motorcycle.” The Castrol Rocket aims to restore that title.

CastrolRocket_Hero_8

 

“This project is a celebration of Castrol and Triumph’s motorsports heritage, innovation, courage and perseverance,” said Greg Heichelbech, President and CEO, Triumph Motorcycles North America. “It’s 

an incredible opportunity to simultaneously chase history and celebrate our heritage. Our hats are off to the Hot Rod Conspiracy/Carpenter Racing team and all of the racers who make land speed racing such a colorful and meaningful sport.

Castrol_A70R1706

Developing a streamliner is a process and a multi-year commitment,” said Heichelbech. “Last year we showed up at Bonneville with a hand built motorcycle that had never been run, and we left with a race bike. Since those inaugural teething runs last summer, we’ve continued development work on the entire motorcycle, including engine development and dyno testing and tuning. We’re excited to see what this year brings.”

 CASTROL ROCKET SPECS:

  • Chassis: Carbon Kevlar monocoque
  • Dimensions: 25’ x 2’ x 3’
  • Engines: Two Triumph Rocket III engines
  • Horsepower: 1,000-plus-horsepower at 9,000 rpm
  • Torque: 500-plus lbs. combined
  • Suspension: Custom made by Hot Rod Conspiracy
  • Fuel: Methanol
  • Tires: Goodyear Land Speed Special
  • Engine Lubricant: Castrol Power RS™ 4T 10W-40 full synthetic oil

For more information on the Castrol Rocket, please visit castrolrocket.com.

 

You Won’t Believe Which Brand Received The Worst “Reliability” Rating

12-BMW-K1600GTL-0151Consumer Reports surveyed 4680 subscribers who are motorcycle owners about the reliability of their motorcycles.  Out of those who responded to the survey, BMW touring and dual sport owners reported more problems with their motorcycles than owners of other brands.

One in every three BMW owners (33%)  said they’ve had an issue with their motorcycle in the past year.  One in every 4 Harley-Davidson owner (25%) reported an issue with their motorcycle.

Honda CBR, and Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R owners reported the least amount of problems.  The issues that were brought up the most by those who responded to the survey were problems with lights, switches, instrumentation, electrical or fuel systems.

Other brands such as  Kawasaki, Victory, Indian, Suzuki and Triumph were not ranked as the owners did not provide enough information as required by the survey.

Triumph Motorcycles recalls 2012-2013 Street Triple and Street Triple R models for ABS problems

Triumph Street Triple R 09  2Triumph Motorcycles is recalling certain model year 2012-2013 Street Triple and Street Triple R motorcycles manufactured in July 2012; and model year 2012-2013 Daytona 675 and Daytona 675 R motorcycles manufactured September 2012 through June 2013. Due to a manufacturing error, the Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) may malfunction and lose anti-lock functionality. The anti-lock function may not perform properly allowing for wheel lock up and skidding, increasing the risk of a crash. Triumph will notify owners and dealers will replace the ABS modulator, free of charge. The manufacturer has not yet provided a notification schedule. Owners may contact Triumph at 1-888-283-5288. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

Triumph Motorcycles (Triumph) is recalling certain model year 2012-2013 Speed Triple motorcycles

SpeedTripleTriumph Motorcycles (Triumph) is recalling certain model year 2012-2013 Speed Triple motorcycles manufactured June 2012 through January 2013. Due to the incorrect engagement of the neutral switch and gear selector drum, the neutral light may remain illuminated despite the motorcycle actually being in gear. The operator may think the motorcycle is in neutral while the motorcycle is in gear. This could lead to unintended movement of the motorcycle and a possible crash. Triumph will notify owners, and dealers will correct the engagement of the neutral switch and gear selector drum, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin by the end of May 2013. Owners may contact Triumph at 1-678-854-2010 for more information.

Customers may contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153); or go to http://www.safercar.gov.

Triumph Recalls Daytona, Street Triple and Thunderbird Models For Wheel Bearing Problems

Triumph 675 front wheel

Triumph recalling bikes due to uncertainty about wheel bearings

Triumph Motorcycles (Triumph) is recalling approx 250 2011-2012 Daytona 675 and Street Triple motorcycles and 2012 Thunderbird and Thunderbird Storm motorcycles.   The wheels were assembled with bearings of an unknown quality.  Wheel bearings of poor quality could fail unexpectedly, increasing the risk of a motorcycle crash.  Triumph will notify owners, and dealers will replace the affected bearings free of charge. Owners may contact Triumph at 1-678-854-2010 for more information.  Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov

 

Report Receipt Date: JAN 29, 2013
NHTSA Campaign Number: 13V032000
Component(s): WHEELS
Potential Number of Units Affected: 250

Triumph to Fix Labels on Trophy Models

2013 TrophyTriumph Motorcycles (Triumph) is recalling certain model year 2013 Trophy motorcycles manufactured from September 5, 2012, through November 29, 2012. These motorcycles were produced with a label bearing incorrect tire data which fails to conform to the labeling requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 120, “Tire Selection and Rims for Motor Vehicles Other Than Passenger Cars,” and they fail to comply with the certification requirements of 49 CFR Part 567, “Certification.”  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, none of the 244 recalled units have been sold to consumers so no owner notification letter will be mailed out.  However, if you just purchased a 2013 Triumph Trophy, you are urged to return to the dealership and have these stickers replaced.


Triumph Introduces New Daytona Models

 

Ever since its debut the Daytona has consistently topped comparison tests, won awards around the world and even trounced high-specification superbikes in the prestigious international Masterbikes shootout, winning this toughest and most comprehensive test of all sports bikes two years in a row. Race versions have taken titles around the world and six years later it’s still a winner on the track. Yet it’s the Daytona’s razor-sharp style and growling, muscle-packed character which has appealed just as much to its dedicated owners.
Now for 2013 Triumph has unleashed an all-new Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R, with a brand-new engine, new frame, fresh and sophisticated new bodywork and a host of other changes built on everything Triumph has learned from the enormously successful outgoing model. A few tweaks and modifications would have kept the 675 on the pace, but the 2013 Daytona is set to raise the bar once again.
The result is a bike which is 3lbs. lighter than the old model, with more power, an extended rev range, greater precision, feel and agility. It’s faster on the track, better on the road and even more satisfying to own.

The heart of the new Daytona is its new engine, which brings more performance and a subtly new character, too. The key change is the wider bore and shorter stroke dimensions, allowing a higher 14,400rpm rev limit to gain more power and a broader spread of usable revs. Facilitating this is the new block, separate from the upper crankcase and with ceramic coated aluminum bores so it can be made stronger to cope with the higher pressures. Power is up 2bhp to 126bhp, peaking earlier at 12,600rpm and revving on for longer. The torque maximum is 2ft.lbs higher at 55.3lb.ft, with an increase across the rev range.

On the intake side are new twin injectors per cylinder, aiding the power and torque gains as well as improving fueling accuracy and efficiency. For the first time, titanium valves are fitted, helping the engine achieve higher revs and allowing Triumph’s engineers room to reshape them to improve gas flow. This has been so effective there has been no need to increase the valve diameter, despite the wider bore. It’s further helped by the new larger section intake, which flows air straight into the center of the bike, right through the headstock, and as a major bonus this increases the quality and volume of the signature three-cylinder snarling intake roar for the rider.

The exhaust system is a clear change as the compact and purposeful new unit now sits beneath the engine rather than beneath the rear seat. This is a consequence of the mission by Triumph’s engineers to centralize the bike’s mass as much as possible and move the weight forward, key factors in making the new Daytona even more agile and yet more stable at speed.
The transmission features a new slip-assist clutch to provide a lighter lever action and help prevent rear wheel hop under heavy braking. This is aided by the engine management which opens the throttle butterflies to reduce engine braking.

As well as incorporating the new, innovative intake duct, the frame uses fewer sections in its construction for a cleaner, stronger design and has sharper geometry and a shorter wheelbase to make full use of the revised mass distribution. The rear subframe, constructed from high pressure die cast aluminium, not only looks fantastic but contributes to the slim, sharp design at the rear of the bike.
The suspension is new and includes the latest fixed-cartridge forks from KYB (formerly Kayaba) and revised rear shock. High-performance Pirelli Supercorsa tyres are fitted as standard. The new switchable ABS system, which weighs just 3lbs., includes a late intervention track setting which allows rear wheel drift.

The ergonomics are altered slightly, with a 10mm reduction in seat height and a little less weight placed on the wrists, but the riding position is still designed for the best control at high speed and on the track.
The new bodywork has a sharper, leaner look that also reflects the higher quality of the new bike. Features such as the deliberately split upper fairing add an air of class, while the attention to detail has moved to a new level and includes a highly attractive upper yoke, machined engine mounting bolts, plugged swingarm mounting plate, a revised cockpit area and quickly detachable number plate/tail-light unit for easy track day conversion.

New lightweight wheels provide lower inertia which assists the speed of turn and the speed of acceleration. It all adds up to a more involved ride.
The comprehensive LCD multi-functional instrument pack features digital speedometer, fuel gauge, trip computer, analog tachometer, lap timer, gear position indicator, programmable gear change lights, and a clock. The unit is able to report tire pressures when Triumph’s accessory Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is fitted, while switchable ABS (compatible models) can be easily configured via the display.
For added security, an electronic immobilizer is included as standard.

Daytona 675R
Once again the R version of the Daytona adds the very highest specification components to increase its performance focus, as well as sporting a unique look.
Öhlins suspension is fitted, including a TTX rear shock and NIX30 inverted forks, providing the R with a wider range of adjustability, improved response and a firmer base set up.
The latest, lighter Brembo Monobloc calipers are fitted for precise and powerful stopping. Switchable ABS is included as standard, to suit conditions, riding environments and rider preference.
The R comes standard with a quick-shift gear change, improved with new software for 2013.
Stunning carbon fiber cockpit infill panels replace the stock ones, further improving the view from the seat, and a carbon fiber rear hugger is also fitted. Cosmetic changes include a red rear subframe and detailing such as the red wheel pinstripes.
Accessories and Warranty
A wide range of factory accessories are available for the Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R, each designed to enhance both the style and the function of the bikes. The carefully-designed engine, swingarm and frame protectors improve the looks as well as reducing component vulnerability. There’s also a selection of CNC-machined components including brake levers and reservoirs, colored dipsticks and oil filler caps. An approved Arrows silencer is available along with alarms, light luggage and LED indicators. The quick-shift can be added as an option to the stock Daytona 675.
As with all new Triumph motorcycles, the Daytona 675 and Daytona 675R come with an unlimited mileage, two-year factory warranty.
Pricing and Availability
The first public reveal for the 2013 Daytona models will be on November 13th at the EICMA Milan Motorcycle Show. U.S. pricing will be $11,599 for the Daytona 675 and $13,499 for the Daytona 675R. Both models will begin arriving in dealerships this February.