Riding The Bones

 

 

 

 

 

bones bike

March. 13 (UPI) – The name of a Florida man’s “Cowasaki” motorcycle is not a misspelling.

For more than 10 years, Orange City resident Reese Moore has been using animal bones to manufacture motorcycles.

His latest chopper, the Cowasaki, is now debuting in an Ormond Beach showroom as part of Bike Week 2014. The $55,000 creation is made from four cow skulls and bones from alligators, raccoons and pigs.

“I just love working with bones,” Moore told the Daytona Beach News-Journal.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2014/03/13/Florida-man-manufactures-Cowasaki-motorcycles-out-of-animal-bones/1741394712913/#ixzz2vrrPDrg0

 


Rev Up Your Engines and Organize a Poker Run

Take advantage of poker’s unique appeal and motorcycles’ distinctive magnetism

poker-run-1Poker runs are a great way to raise funds for a charitable cause. The event normally uses motorcycles; however, different variations involved bicycles, cars, boats, and even horses. But no matter what type of vehicle you prefer to use, as long as you have a full tank of gasoline and the drive to help those in need, then you’re all revved up and good to go. Organizing a fun poker run may seem daunting at first, but in hindsight, all the hard work and stress will surely pay off once you see the fruits of all your labor. Here are some of the important points to consider before planning a poker run.
1) Various institutions like the Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the H. E. R. O. E. S. Care provide a huge helping hand for their targeted cause. That’s why it’s always important to determine a charitable cause to raise funds for. Whether it is for a specific type of cancer research or a campaign to directly assist the United States’ brave soldiers, you should thoroughly plan and research ahead of time.

2) Since time is of the essence when organizing a poker run, you need to set a suitable date for the event. Pick out a time of the year when the weather smiles back at you for a more carefree riding experience. However, if your community has an upcoming festival or feast day, you can also consider connecting it in concurrence with the event.

3) Make sure to have reliable insurance papers and other necessary documents for your event to push through. You have to greatly consider the importance of all the riders’ safety and the establishments’ liability insurance. 

4) To boost your funds, you have to get sponsors to support your event. It can be as simple as partypoker logo being displayed along the route or as fancy as a gasoline sponsorship from ExxonMobil. It won’t be hard to find an appropriate backer for a legitimate poker run event, especially with the attractiveness of the game of poker, and the offhand charm of motorcycles. 

5) You need to firmly set guidelines for the event’s participants, and provide each one with a copy. Also, make certain the officials and other organizers know how the game works and the ranking of each poker hand. You wouldn’t want to get confused between participants and officials.

6) Carefully map a route while you drive and time it. Allot extra time for games and pit stops along the path. Convenience establishments are good options, especially when participants need to get their fill of coffee, soda, or take bathroom breaks. Just make sure to contact the management to notify them about possible traffic congestion in the area.

7) Lastly, there is no “I” in “team,” so you have to gather up volunteers for the poker run. Supply everyone with basic essentials like food, water, and uniforms for the whole day event. And to add more fun, you can also let them arbitrate exciting activities and mini-games in their outposts.

Carmen Poses With Police Bike; Avoids Ticket

We don’t know the identity of the lucky LAPD motorcycle cop who spotted Miss Sexy Electra “slightly speeding” and pulled her over, but at least he was thoughtful enough to snap this mug shot forus.   While “officially” there was no record of the stop, we’re assuming since Carmen herself tweeted this photo posing with the officer’s bike, she was given a warning, probably a stern one.    Since we know there will be a lot of negative comments about how the cops are showing favoritism and such, just remember, “haters are going to hate!”

carmen_with_police

Did GEICO Consider Irony in Song Choice

The insurance company GEICO has been aggressively courting motorcycle riders.  Their latest campaign, Motorcycle Money Man, uses the song,  Midnight Rider  by the Allman Brothers.

The irony that an insurance company would choose a song from an artist who was killed in a motorcycle wreck to promote motorcycle insurance was not lost on many motorcycle forums and websites.

What do you think?  Should GEICO have used another song?  Tell us in the poll below. Video below the poll

France In America- One Man’s 21,000 Mile Odyssey

France In America Book Cover

FRANCE IN AMERICA is a visually stunning 400-page volume offering a unique mix of Americana, travel, motorcycling and a personal account of male mid-life transition. The book showcases an extraordinary 21,000-mile solo journey by a man leaving behind his professional life and identity to explore America and fulfill a life-long dream.

Gary France is English and lives near London. In a few short years, Gary’s self-description changed from “Project Management Executive” to “Writer, traveller and motorcyclist, who is happiest when combining all three”. That’s quite a shift, but nevertheless an authentic summary.

Riding with just his thoughts for company, Gary’s description of his 4-month trip unfolds through a down-to-earth record of what he saw, who he met and what he felt on the road, backed up with an impressive photographic inventory. As he clicks up the miles from the New England states, through the Midwest and the Rockies, and closing in the desert states of the Pacific coast, his thoughts, language and photographs become increasingly reflective and vivid as the ‘journey’ progresses – revealing more and more of his internal exploration and steady winding down.

The book will resonate with many. Not just those who wish they could make such a once-in-a-lifetime road trip, but also with the many men who have faced the unspoken uncertainties and reassessments of midlife.

This is not only a detailed guide about where to go and what to see in the USA. It is also a personal story of one person seizing the moment – a living testimony to the maxim that travel is not so much about the destination as it is about the journey itself. One man living his dream, and carefully cornering through the opportunities that midlife presents.

You can purchase the book at  www.garysfrance.com after the March 4, 2012 launch.

 

And You Call Yourself A Biker?

rockstore-5501The Oxford English Dictionary, (OED) was started four years before the outbreak of the Civil War, and according to the Guinness Book of World Records, it is the world’s most comprehensive single-language dictionary in print.  The online edition receives 2 million hits per month from paying subscribers.  So, we’ll concede they know a thing or two about the English language.

So it was a little surprising but not unwelcome when the Wall Street Journal reported recently that the Oxford (OED) had “softened” the pejorative  or negative connotation of the word “biker” in its online dictionary.

In the beginning, the term was defined as people who rode bicycles.  Of course in 1903, the Davidson brothers and Mr. Harley attached an engine to a bicycle frame and 50 years later the word “bikers” became synonymous with dirty long hair, denim, leather and tattoos and most often associated with “motorcycle gang members.”

Now OED has tweaked their definition a bit, including the word “motorcyclist” in the description.    Calling someone a motorcyclist brings to mind a more wholesome, family image of a hobbyist.  A “biker” is much more likely to be someone who is interested in the more hardcore aspects of the two wheel lifestyle, such as drinking and partying.

The OED online site still lists the colloquial term as someone who rides a bicycle.  The next official definition is “A motorcyclist, esp. a member of a motorcycle club or gang.”   

But wait a sec!  The article in the WSJ says the dictionary uses the term “one who is a member of a gang or group.”    But either the Wall Street Journal got it wrong, or someone at Oxford changed the words group to motorcycle club after WSJ posted their story.

Not a big difference, but subtle enough to change the connotation.  As someone who rides two wheels,  is Oxford is saying that to be called a “biker” you have to belong to a MC or a gang?

However, if you thought for a minute the explosion in popularity of the motorcycle subculture had erased any social stigma attached to the two wheel lifestyle, (esp with the stuffy high brow folks who edit English language dictionary’s) then you’re mistaken.

To prove my point, OED defines the term “biker bar” as n. a bar frequented by motorcyclists, esp. one regarded as disreputable.    

The only thing we’re left wondering is “how many bikers  does it take to constitute a biker bar?”  

 

 

If You’re Going To Run, Get A Tune-Up First

_a_bilde The advice for Louisiana resident Justin Richardson  is, “make sure your bike will run, before you run from the po-po.”

On Monday Feb 4th, Sheriff’s deputies say they tried to stop Richardson as he sped by them on U.S. Highway 80 in Bossier LA.  As the deputy approached, Richardson throttled his Suzuki Hybusa, eventually reaching speeds of over 100 mph.

Everything was working according to his plan, at least until the bike crapped out, leaving him stranded and on foot.

And as fast as his bike was, Richardson was a whole lot slower as police quickly caught him in the median as he was hoofing it.

He was arrested on charges of aggravated flight from an officer, resisting an officer with force, speeding, no insurance, no license plate and no motorcycle endorsement and booked into the Bossier Maximum Security Facility.

Police are not saying what caused the bike to break down, and  they would not confirm nor deny the rumor that Richardson unknowingly hit the kill switch causing the bike to stall.

Training Class Fail!

grab it lightly....

grab it lightly….

Either this guy wasn’t paying attention when the instructor told him “not the grab” the brakes or he didn’t have a clue what “grabbing” the brakes meant.  Either way,  he’s lucky to come away with nothing more than being a little stiff and sore.

The typical training class “fail!”

What’s interesting for us is that this training is taking place on a public street, not the best venue for a new rider learning how to ride in wet conditions.

Customized Donkey

customized donkeyNow we know when you’re jonesing for your motorcycle fix you’ll do just about anything to get it, but we think this might be taking the art of customizing donkey’s a little too far.  Sure, you probably won’t see another one like it at your local bike night but if this is your only resource, maybe you should be willing to blend in with the crowd for the time being.  At least until you can afford a custom paint job on a real honest to goodness motorcycle.

We’re not sure what the exhaust came from, but it looks a little like an old Norton or Triumph thumper.

What do you think?  Give us your opinion in the comment section below.

 

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may no longer require minimum gas purchase at certain pumps

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is apparently scrapping its requirement that all consumers buy at least four gallons of gasoline from certain gas pumps that dispense the new E15 ethanol-gasoline blend, the American Motorcyclist Association reports.

The EPA first revealed its minimum-purchase requirement to the AMA in a letter dated Aug. 1, responding to AMA concerns that E15 — a gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent ethanol by volume — could be put in motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle gas tanks inadvertently when consumers used blender pumps. A blender pump dispenses different fuel blends through the same hose, and the vast majority of motorcycles and ATVs in use today aren’t designed to operate on E15 fuel.

The EPA had said that the minimum purchase requirement was meant to dilute any residual E15 fuel left in the hose.

On Dec. 17, in response to ongoing AMA concerns, the EPA indicated to the AMA that it would no longer require a minimum purchase of four gallons. Instead, the EPA will now likely require a label on blender pumps that dispense E10 and E15 through the same hose that state the pump is solely for passenger cars and trucks.

In addition, the EPA indicated it will require stations that sell E15 to also have a pump with a dedicated E10 hose for use by motorcycles and other vehicles the EPA hasn’t approved for E15 use.

“With E15 gasoline, our members who make a concerted effort to fuel their motorcycles or ATVs with E10-or-less gasoline may be unknowingly refueling with residual fuel left in the hose,” Wayne Allard, AMA vice president for government relations, had said to the EPA before the agency’s Dec. 17 comments.

“Unlike an automobile or SUV that has a large fuel tank, the residual fuel left in a fueling hose could be detrimental to the performance of motorcycle or ATV engines due to the small size of their fuel tanks and the higher concentration of ethanol that would, therefore, be present in the fuel,” Allard had said. “In addition, the use of E15 will lower fuel efficiency and possibly cause premature engine failure. Use of E15 fuel voids many manufacturer warranties. In off-road engines, the effects can even be dangerous for users.”

The AMA has repeatedly expressed concerns to government officials and federal lawmakers about possible damage to motorcycle and ATV engines caused by the inadvertent use of E15 when the new fuel becomes widely available, and has asked that motorcycles and ATVs be part of any scientific study into the effects of E15.

Ethanol is essentially grain alcohol produced from crops such as corn that is mixed with gasoline to produce an ethanol-gasoline blend motor fuel. In October 2010, the EPA approved the use of E15 in model year 2007 and newer light-duty vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles). Then, in January 2011, the EPA added model year 2001-06 light-duty vehicles to the approved list.

No motorcycles or ATVs are currently on the list.