PROPOSED BILL WOULD PREVENT YOUR MOTORCYCLE FROM TESTIFYING AGAINST YOU IN COURT

data collected from this device can be used against you in court, and most people don't even realize it.

data collected from this device can be used against you in court, and most people don’t even realize it.

Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) wants to change the language of the Driver Privacy Act bill to protect all information recorded by event data recorders installed on all “motor vehicles,” including motorcycles. The way S. 1925 is currently written grants privacy only for data the government “requires” to be collected.

Currently the government does not require “black boxes” on motorcycles, only passenger vehicles, trucks and buses. But some current motorcycle models are equipped with the recording devices. A similar bill in the House is worded that “any data recorded on any event data recorder in an automobile or motorcycle shall be considered the property of the owner of the automobile or motorcycle.”

Under current law, Insurance companies, law enforcement and auto rental agencies can access the data on the device and can use it as evidence against the driver/owner in legal proceedings. Data recorders collect a wide range of information on crashes, including whether the brakes were applied, the speed at the time of impact, the steering angle, and whether seat belt circuits were shown as “Buckled” or “Unbuckled” at the time of the crash.

Fourteen states have statutes that restrict access to the event data recorder or limit the use of recovered EDR information.

Pennsylvania Limits Motorcycle Learners Permits

1motorcyclesafetyRep. Seth Grove introduced HB 892 in this session of the Pennsylvania State Legislature in an effort to curb the practice of “serial permitting” by novice riders in the state.  The bill was just signed by the Governor and becomes effective immediately.

The new law restricts the number of times someone can reapply for a motorcycle learners permit to three times in a 5 year period.  Prior to this law, there was no restriction on the number of times an individual could reapply for a learners permit and thereby skirting the need to take the full motorcycle license written and riding test.

“We have been dealing with individuals who continually violate the restrictions of motorcycle permits because they treat permits like actual licenses,” Grove said.

The State ABATE also supported the bill and provides providing free student motorcycle safety training, with an opportunity to obtain a class “M” license upon completion of the course.

For more info, visit www.abatepa.org, the state Department of Transportation’s Live Free Ride Alive website, or call 1-800-845-9533.

AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Will Honor Derek ‘Nobby’ Clark in November

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Famed Grand Prix motorcycle tuner Derek “Nobby” Clark has been elected to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in a supplemental vote, the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation reports.

“Derek ‘Nobby’ Clark stands shoulder-to-shoulder with roadracing’s most enduring legends, and played a key role in successes that will go down in history among the greatest of the sport,” said Jeffrey V. Heininger, chairman of the AMHF. “It’s time for Mr. Clark to take his rightful place among the many legends who embody the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame.”

For 25 years, Clark was one of the world’s leading motorcycle race mechanics. In addition to being a part of 17 FIM Grand Prix world championships, earned in classes ranging from 50cc to 500cc, his teams won three Daytona 200s, one Daytona 100, four Imola 200s and eight Italian championships. Clark not only excelled at the highest level, but also worked with some of the greatest motorcycle racers in history, including Hall of Famers Mike Hailwood, Giacomo Agostini and Kenny Roberts.

“It certainly was a surprise,” Clark said. “I’m very excited, and I’m looking forward to being in Las Vegas for the induction ceremony and seeing my old friends. I haven’t seen quite a few of them for quite awhile, so it’s going to be like a family reunion.”

Clark also expressed his appreciation for the support he received during the supplemental vote process.

“I’d like to thank everybody who supported me,” Clark said. “I admire them, and I respect them, and I hope they all come back to the Hall of Fame. In my opinion, all of them are legends, and I respect them not just for what they’ve done in racing, but for what they’ve done for motorcycling in general. Motorcycling is a big family, and that is something we are privileged to have.”

Clark joins the late Rod Bush, KTM North America president and industry visionary; pioneering female motocrosser Sue Fish; 1975 AMA Supercross Champion Jimmy Ellis; world-class bike restorer Brian Slark; the late Al Wilcox, iconic race starter; and off-road racing legend Ty Davis as a member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Class of 2012.

The supplemental vote for Mr. Clark was implemented by the AMHF, which overseas the Hall of Fame, in response to procedural errors that invalidated Mr. Clark’s inclusion on the original ballot. The supplemental vote did not affect the other 2012 Hall of Fame inductees.

“The members of the AMHF Board of Directors extend our sincerest apologies to Mr. Clark for the mistakes that invalidated his original ballot,” Heininger said. “By way of this supplemental vote, we’ve ensured that Mr. Clark’s induction took place with the utmost sincerity and that no one can question his inclusion in the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.”

The supplemental vote was tallied by the independent voting service Votenet. The accounting firm Plante Moran independently audited the results.

The class of 2012 will officially be inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame on Nov. 16 as part of the AMA Legends Weekend. The weekend also includes the 2012 AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Dave Mungenast Memorial Concours d’Elegance on Saturday, Nov. 17, featuring many of the country’s most impressive original and restored classic motorcycles.

In addition to the current class, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame induction ceremony shines the spotlight on two previously inducted members of the Hall of Fame, reminding the motorcycling community of the amazing careers of these Motorcycle Hall of Fame Legends. For 2012, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Legends will be 1998 inductees Malcolm Smith, a pioneer in off-road motorcycling and a star in the motorcycle documentary “On Any Sunday,” and Mert Lawwill, the 1969 AMA Grand National Champion whose title defense was the central theme of the timeless film.

Tickets for the AMA Legends Weekend are now available through this online registration form:http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e5r7zy8ea4316694&llr=vw9ldxbab or by calling (800) 342-5464.

The AMA Legends Weekend will be held at the Las Vegas Red Rock Resort, a world-class spa, hotel and casino, featuring a range of entertainment, dining and family-friendly attractions. The facility’s expansive ballrooms provide a stunning backdrop for the AMA Legends Weekend. Room reservations are available now at a special group rate by calling (866) 767-7773 and referencing group code RCIAME or AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST. Online room reservations are available at www.redrocklasvegas.com.

Georgia Motorcyclists Can Use HOT Lanes Toll Free

Georgia’s State Road & Tollway Authority has started issuing the Peach Pass for use with the GA 400 tolls and the new HOT lanes on I-85.  The HOT lanes are replacing the HOV lanes on some interstates in Georgia starting with I-85, and will require a toll for their use by all vehicles except those which are exempt.  Fortunately, just as motorcycles are able to use the HOV lanes, they will be also permitted in the HOT lanes toll-free as exempt vehicles but you will need a Peach Pass device.

If you plan on using your motorcycle Peach Pass only for the HOT lanes and never for the GA 400 toll, you can contact the Peach Pass customer service center at 1-855-PCH-PASS (724-7277) and set up an exempt vehicle account free of charge, although they will require a credit card number to keep on file.  The first 30,000 Peach Pass devices are being sent out free of charge to account holders and as of this printing they still had plenty of free ones left.  If you plan to use both the GA 400 toll lanes and the HOT lanes while on your motorcycle, you will need to set up the account online with a $20.00 initial deposit – motorcyclists still have to pay the GA 400 toll like everyone else.

You can find more information online at www.peachpass.com.


Lawmakers Told That Local Communities Should Decide Land Uses

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Supporters of H.R. 1581 — the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act of 2011 — told U.S. lawmakers on July 26 that the bill would allow local communities to decide the proper uses of 43 million acres of protected public land, which could include off-highway riding, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

But critics opposed releasing the protected land all at once. Instead, they want Congress to release the land on a piecemeal basis.

The statements were made during a U.S. House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands hearing on H.R. 1581, the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act of 2011. The measure would remove the stringent use restrictions on almost 6.7 million acres managed by the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and on 36.1 million acres of U.S. Forest Service (USFS) land that was evaluated for strict congressional Wilderness land-use designations.

A Wilderness designation is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Once Congress designates an area as Wilderness, nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal, including off-highway vehicle (OHV) and bicycle riding.

The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations that meet the criteria established by Congress in 1964, but anti-OHV forces have been abusing legislative and administrative processes in repeated attempts to ban responsible OHV recreation on public land.

The BLM and USFS have determined the 43 million acres covered by H.R. 1581 aren’t suitable for Wilderness designation, but because of various laws and rules they must continue to strictly manage the land until Congress releases it for other possible uses.

The Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act would release the land, freeing up land managers to determine new uses, if any, such as allowing responsible OHV recreation where it currently isn’t allowed.

U.S. Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who was joined by other lawmakers in introducing the bill, said the measure “simply acts on recommendations made by the federal government and returns the management of tens of millions of acres of public land to local communities so that more Americans can have access to our public lands.

“These communities know best how to manage the lands, whether for increased recreation, preservation or development,” he said.

U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) echoed McCarthy’s comments.

“As chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus, I am proud to be an original co-sponsor of this important piece of legislation,” Pearce said. “H.R. 1581 is good for the West and good for America. It will allow more Americans to enjoy our federal lands, and allow us to actually protect the habitats of wildlife through proper land management.”

But BLM Director Robert Abbey, who opposed the bill, testified that even though the land didn’t earn an endorsement for Wilderness designation before, it might now.

“These recommendations are now 20 years old, and the on-the-ground work associated with them is as much as 30 years old,” Abbey said. “During that time in a number of places, resource conditions have changed, our understanding of mineral resources has changed, and public opinion has changed.

“If these suitability recommendations were made today, many of them would undoubtedly be different,” he said.

The 43 million acres have been locked up for years, if not decades, even though federal land managers have noted the land doesn’t qualify for the very restrictive Wilderness designation. AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska wondered how the land could qualify for Wilderness designation now when it was deemed unsuitable 20 or 30 years ago.

“For years, groups hoping to keep responsible off-highway riders off public land have been able to get areas earmarked for possible inclusion in the nation’s Wilderness system, which immediately bars off-highway riding, bicycling and almost all other activities while the Wilderness study is under way,” Podliska said.

“We commend Rep. Kevin McCarthy for introducing H.R. 1581, the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act, and Chairman Rob Bishop for holding a hearing on this bill,” he said. “The hearing illustrated why this bill is necessary and that all Americans should be able to enjoy our federal lands.

“The actions taken by the current Congress could have a profound impact on the ability of responsible off-highway riders to use public land,” Podliska continued. “It’s important that all responsible riders stay informed about Wilderness bills in Congress, and take action, when necessary, to help protect their right to ride.”

The best way to stay informed is to sign up for AMA email Action Alerts at http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/GetInvolved/ActionAlertSignUp.aspx

American Motorcyclist Association Wants Motorcycles Included in Study of Ethanol-Blended Fuel

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) is asking a key U.S. House panel to include motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) in any future study of ethanol-blended gasoline.

In a letter sent July 11 to the House Energy and Environment Subcommittee, the AMA, along with its partner organization, the All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA), urged subcommittee Chairman Andy Harris (R-Md.) “that on- or off-highway motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) be part of any scientific study by the NAS” related to ethanol-blended gasoline. NAS stands for the National Academy of Sciences.

The subcommittee held a hearing on July 7 entitled “Hitting the Ethanol Blend Wall: Examining the Science on E15.” The hearing focused on E15, a new gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent alcohol by volume. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in October 2010 approved the use of E15 in model year 2007 and newer light-duty vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles). In January 2011, the EPA added model year 2001-2006 light-duty vehicles to the approved list.

No on- or off-highway motorcycles or ATVs are currently approved.

At its hearing, the subcommittee indicated that it may require the EPA to arrange with the NAS to study a full range of issues related to E15.

In the letter, AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska said the AMA and ATVA have concerns about: E15 being put in motorcycles or ATVs mistakenly and damaging engines; the continued availability of gasoline that has no ethanol, or gasoline with only a 10 percent blend that is safe for use in motorcycles and ATVs; the possibility that “blender pumps” — which dispense multiple grades of gasoline through a single hose — could introduce enough ethanol into gasoline to be used in a motorcycle or ATV to damage the vehicle; and that ethanol absorbs water, which could be harmful to motorcycles and ATVs.

“In conclusion, to address our concerns, the AMA and ATVA urge that on- or off-highway motorcycles and ATVs be part of any scientific study by NAS,” Podliska wrote. “Not only should the study focus on the short- and long-term impacts on vehicles and engines, but should consider financial implications of increased ethanol use in gasoline on consumers; fuel producers, distributors and retailers; vehicle and engine manufacturers, dealers and service facilities; and the environment.”

To read the letter, click here:http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Federal/Harris_NAS_Ethanol_7-11-2011.sflb.ashx?download=true

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About the American Motorcyclist Association
Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists’ interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through its support of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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75 Federal Lawmakers Now Support Kids Just Want to Ride Act

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – A bill that would exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from a law that effectively bans their sale at the end of the year is gaining more support in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Seventy-five U.S. House members now support the bill — H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) — that would exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content portion of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

“The Kids Just Want To Ride Act has broad bipartisan support, but that’s not why it deserves to become a law,” Rehberg said. “It deserves to become a law because it’s good policy that will keep kids safe and preserve jobs. There are plenty of things to argue about in Congress, but keeping kids safe by allowing them to ride on kid-sized motorcycles, ATVs and snowmobiles shouldn’t be one of them.”

Rep. Michael Burgess, M.D. (R-Texas), who is co-chairman of the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus and a co-signor of H.R. 412, also stressed the safety aspects of the bill.

“As a medical doctor, I know how important safety is and [I] am pleased to hear that 75 members of Congress have now co-sponsored this important legislation,” Burgess said. “Bills like the Kids Just Want to Ride Act demonstrate that Congress can provide flexibility for companies while ensuring safety for consumers.”

H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, is aimed squarely at the CPSIA, which is commonly known as the lead law. The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part.

The CPSIA also requires that all childrens’ products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed, the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) will effectively be banned.

“Many lawmakers on Capitol Hill recognize that a common-sense solution is needed to solve the problems created by the CPSIA so that families can continue to enjoy responsible outdoor motorized recreation,” said Rick Podliska, AMA Washington representative. “And almost daily, more and more lawmakers are recognizing that H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, offers that common-sense solution.”

The latest flood of support for the Kids Just Want to Ride Act follows a day of lobbying by kids and their parents who descended on Washington, D.C., in late May as part of the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb lobbying effort. The children, dressed in motocross gear, and their parents shared their stories about enjoying responsible motorized recreation, and the need to change the CPSIA, in discussions with lawmakers and congressional staff members.

Podliska noted, however, that some lawmakers may still be unaware of H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act. He is urging anyone concerned about the future of off-highway riding for youth to contact their federal lawmakers and ask them to support H.R. 412.

The easiest way to contact your lawmaker on the issue is to go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/IssuesLegislation.aspx

Federal Funding Language Would Block ‘lead law’ Enforcement

"Small businesses that sell small off-highway vehicles also suffer under the CPSIA," he said. "For the safety of children, and for the health of small businesses, the AMA strongly urges the adoption of this language."

PICKERINGTON, Ohio –A key federal agency can’t enforce a ban on the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) under language inserted into a federal government funding measure in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

On June 16, Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) got language inserted into the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill for the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, that prevents the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) from using money to enforce lead-content limits on kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs).

The limits are contained in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is known as the lead law.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products to undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the CPSC, which is responsible for implementing the law.

Kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs contain amounts of lead that exceed the parts-per-million levels allowed under the CPSIA.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill provides annual funding for several key federal government agencies, including the CPSC. If the full House eventually adopts the language, then it still needs to clear the Senate before the bill goes to the president to be signed into law.

“While the original legislation was intended to keep kids safe from lead content in toys, the overreaching enforcement wound up putting them at risk by forcing them to use larger, more dangerous machines that are intended only for adults,” said Rehberg, who is a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

“While I’m working on a permanent fix to get rid of this dangerous regulation, my appropriations language will buy more time,” he said.

Rehberg was referring to H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, which he introduced to exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content restrictions of the CPSIA.

Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO, thanked Rehberg for his efforts.

“This language is an important step in efforts to lift the ban on the sale of kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs imposed by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008,” Dingman said. “America’s young riders need to be able to ride appropriately sized machines to help them stay safe. If those machines aren’t available, then they may ride bigger machines that may be difficult for them to control.

To urge your federal lawmakers to support the Rehberg language in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill, and to support H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/rights/issueslegislation

Maine Adopts Practical Test for Measuring Motorcycle Sound

Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle.

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Maine has adopted a simple yet reliable testing procedure that allows motorcyclists to prove their bikes don’t violate Maine’s motor vehicle sound law, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Under a new law that went into effect on May 26, motorcyclists ticketed for excessive sound emitting from their motorcycle exhausts can go to a certified inspection station for sound testing.

There, the exhaust system would be tested using the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2825 stationary sound testing procedure — “Measurement of Exhaust Sound Pressure Levels of Stationary On-Highway Motorcycles” — which the SAE developed and adopted with support from the Motorcycle Industry Council in May 2009.

Under the SAE J2825 standard, which the AMA has endorsed, decibel limits range from 92 dBA at idle for all motorcycles, to 100 dBA at certain RPMs for various motorcycles, depending on the type of engine. If a motorcycle meets these limits during the certified testing, then it is evidence that the motorcycle doesn’t violate the state’s sound law.

“This new law is good news for responsible motorcyclists who ride in Maine because it provides an objective way to prove that a motorcycle doesn’t violate the state’s sound law, rather than relying on subjective judgments,” said Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager. “We applaud the state of Maine — the first in the nation — for adopting the SAE J2825 standard.”

The AMA has long maintained a position of strong opposition to excessive motorcycle sound. The SAE J2825 standard is at the heart of model legislation developed by the AMA for use by jurisdictions seeking a simple, consistent and economical way to deal with sound complaints related to on-highway motorcycles within the larger context of excessive sound from all sources.

For information on the AMA’s model legislation, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Other/Model_On_Highway_Sound_Ordinance-1.sflb.ashx

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To see the AMA’s position on excessive motorcycle sound, seehttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/PositionStatements/ExcessiveMotorcycleSound.aspx

American Motorcyclist Association Seeks End to Virginia Motorcycle-Only Checkpoints

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) has expressed concern to Gov. Bob McDonnell over a recent motorcycle-only checkpoint in northern Virginia, calling the stop “discriminatory.”

The Arlington County (Va.) Police Department conducted a motorcycle-only checkpoint on May 28 during the annualRolling Thunder gathering in Washington, D.C. The Rolling Thunder event, held May 27-29, involved tens of thousands of motorcyclists riding to the nation’s capital to seek accountability for prisoners of war and service personnel missing in action.

In the letter, dated May 31, AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska told McDonnell that motorcycle-only checkpoints are discriminatory and profile only motorcyclists.

“The AMA urges the Commonwealth of Virginia to suspend the use of motorcycle-only checkpoints until questions raised by the motorcycling community have been addressed,” Podliska wrote.

Those questions include: How do motorcycle-only checkpoints increase the safety of motorcyclists? Where do states draw their authority to conduct motorcycle-only checkpoints? Is “probable cause” required to stop a motorcycle and, if so, what constitutes probable cause?

“The safety of motorcyclists is better served by efforts that minimize injuries and fatalities by preventing crashes in the first place,” Podliska wrote. “The most efficient way of doing so is not through sporadic, discriminatory roadside checkpoints, but by mitigating crash causation.”

Copies of the letter were also sent to Arlington County Police Chief M. Douglas Scott, Virginia House of Delegates Transportation Committee Chairman Joe May and Virginia Senate Transportation Committee Chairwoman Yvonne Miller.

The Virginia motorcycle-only roadside checkpoint is the latest in a series of the discriminatory checkpoints that have been conducted in Utah, New York state and Georgia. The AMA is strongly opposed to this practice.

In a victory for motorcyclists, lawmakers in New Hampshire recently approved, and the governor signed into law, a bill that prohibits law enforcement agencies or political subdivisions from accepting federal money for motorcycle-only roadside checkpoints.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) gave Georgia a $70,000 grant to conduct one or more roadside motorcycle-only checkpoints and the state police did so as thousands of motorcyclists rode through the state on their way to Daytona Beach, Fla., for Bike Week March 4-13.

The AMA opposes the federal motorcycle-only checkpoint grant program, and U.S. Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) and some of his colleagues have asked U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood to suspend the program.

Sensenbrenner has also introduced H.R. 904, which would prohibit the U.S. transportation secretary from providing funds for motorcycle-only checkpoints.

“The NHTSA should focus on decreasing the likelihood of crashes from occurring in the first place,” Podliska said. “No public money should be applied to promoting such a program without first addressing questions from the motorcycling community.”

In addition to letters submitted to the past and present governors of Georgia, the AMA also sent a letter to NHTSA Administrator David Strickland urging him to suspend the grant program that gives states money for motorcycle-only checkpoints until questions have been addressed.

To view the AMA’s letter to McDonnell, click here:http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_State/5_31_2011_GovMcDonnell_MOC.sflb.ashx?download=true.