Europe Set to Require Mandatory ABS for Motorcycles

According to different sources, and at least one supplier, legislation establishing mandatory anti-lock brakes on motorcycles may soon be sanctioned by the European Parliament before the summer recess at the end of this month.

The imminent decision follows a long consultation process with industry bodies, manufacturers and trade associations.

It’s expected that the law will insist that all new 125cc+ motorcycles manufactured after 2017 will have to be fitted with OE ABS braking systems in a bid to increase rider safety.

This move would likely result in ABS on all motorcycles imported for the American market  since the manufacturers are not likely to remove ABS on bikes imported into this country.


Black Hills HD to Open Store in Wall SD

Wall Drug Store, located in Wall South Dakota became famous from its self-promotion. Billboards advertising the drug store can be seen for hundreds of miles throughout South Dakota and the neighboring states.  In WWII, American GI’s even painted signs throughout Europe pointing the way to the iconic tourist trap.  That tradition continues today with soldiers from South Dakota and neighboring states.

But, beginning in May, a new sign will crop up in Wall.  The iconic bar and shield of Harley-Davidson will be erected as the owners of Black Hills HD have decided to venture out and open a satellite store in Wall.

According to a report in the Rapid City Journal, the decision was made because Harley corporate ended a program allowing dealers to sell “event items” like Sturgis rally shirts outside of Harley stores.

For years Black Hills HD sold its rally shirts and other merchandise at Wall Drugs.

The store is expected to open in May, 2011.


Watch Out! It’s “Pavement Patty” Speed Bump

is it a real child or just "pavement patty?"

Leave it to the Canadians to use an optical illusory speed bump to slow down drivers.  Named “Pavement Patty” the 2D image resembles a child chasing after a ball and the pavement painting appears to rise up as the driver gets closer to it, reaching full 3-D realism at around 100 feet: “Its designers created the image to give drivers who travel at the street’s recommended 18 miles per hour (30 km per hour) enough time to stop before hitting Pavement Patty — acknowledging the spectacle before they continue to safely roll over her.”

The effect is only visual as the entire painting is flat.  Critics warn that drivers will become accustomed to seeing these “children in the street” faux speed bumps and suffer what Scientific America calls “situational blindness.”   Or put another way, like the child who cried wolf too many times, drivers may just start to associate the image of children in the street as something fake, with tragic consequences.

Canada isn’t the first country to use faux speed bumps.  They’re common in Europe, although their effectiveness wears off the longer they remain in one place and drivers become accustomed to them.

In 2008, Philadelphia started using plastic road paintings resembling spikes.