Hydrogen Peroxide Powered Rocket Motorcycle Sells On EBay

Glenn Brittian built a hydrogen peroxide powered rocket motorcycle that will reach 400 mph in the quarter mile and offered it for sale on Ebay for $27,000.   Gerd Habermann Racing brought it, but we don’t know the final purchase price.  While 400 mph is a bit quicker than the average production bike, it’s still a long way from the record.  Set in September 2010, Rocky Robinson went 605.697 mph in the Top Oil Ack-Attack Streamliner, slightly edging out Chris Carr in the BUB Lucky 7 Streamliner the year before (591.244)

As for this yellow road runner, don’t expect to see it carving up the Dragon anytime soon.   It’s one of those bikes that only looks good going from stop light to stop light.  In fact, that’s about as far as you’re going to be able to go, the way it gobbles up its hydrogen peroxide fuel,  but at least you’ll own those lame ass  Busa’s who think they’re the schiznit!

This was lifted from Gizmag.com

Brittian’s rocket motorcycle is powered by a dual nozzle rocket engine providing a design maximum of 3500 pounds (15.6 kN) of thrust. When running at that thrust it eats about 30 lb (14 kg) of fuel every second, sucking the fuel tank dry after the few seconds of a quarter-mile drag. The rocket engine uses high-test (80-98 percent pure) hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide does not burn when used in a rocket engine, but passes by a catalyst that makes it decompose into water and oxygen. The water released is converted into steam at about 1100° F (870° C), which then exits through the nozzle producing thrust.

It has become nearly impossible in recent years to buy high-test hydrogen peroxide (in the United States sales to the public have even been banned by the Department of Homeland Security), so it is often concentrated by various methods. As the concentration process is perhaps more dangerous than handling and using hydrogen peroxide, it is not to be undertaken lightly.

Gizmag has the fullstory on their website.

KTM Recalls Dirt Bikes For Faulty Fuel Hoses

KTM is recalling 1,181 EXC-F and EXC models for potential fuel line problems

KTM North America, Inc.’s (KTM) is recalling (1,181 units)  2012 and 2013 350 EXC-F and 500 EXC motorcycles manufactured from September 2011 through August 2012. Due to the supplier’s manufacturing inconsistencies, the preformed fuel hoses may develop cracks or holes at either end. During use, the fuel hoses, located between the fuel tank and the throttle body fuel rail, may allow fuel to leak. The fuel may leak onto the rear tire while the motorcycle is being ridden, increasing the risk of a crash. It is also possible that, in the presence of an ignition source, a fire can occur. KTM will notify owners, and dealers will replace the defective fuel hoses free of charge. The safety recall is expected to begin in early December 2012. Owners may contact KTM Customer relations at 1-888-985-6090. Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

Kawasaki Recalls Fuel Tank Assembly Component

Vehicle Make /Model: Kawasaki/ KLX250                                                           Model Year(s): 2009-2010

Manufacture: Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A.                                                     Mfr’s Report Date: Jun 02, 2011

NHTSA Campaign ID Number: 11V316000                                                         NHTSA Action Number: N/A

Component: Fuel System, Other: Storage:Tank Assembly:Mounting

Potential Number of Units Affected: 9,460

Summary:
Kawasaki is recalling certain model year 2009-2010 KLX250 Motorycles. The fuel tank could leak from cracks at the spot weld(s) on the side mount tabs die to stress caused by excessive clearence between the fuel tank and a frame-mounted rubber damper.

Consequence:
Fuel Leakage in the presence of spark or flame could cause a fire or explosion possibly resulting in injury or death.

Remedy:
Dealers will inspect and correct the fueltank as necessary, free of charge. The safety recall is expected to begin during June 2011. Owners may contact Kawasaki Consumer Services Dept. @ 1-866-802-9381

Notes:
Kawasaki Safety recall No. MC11-04. Owners may also contact the National Highway Safety Administration’s Vehicle Safety Hotline @ 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to  HTTP://WWW.SAFERCAR.GOV

5 Ways to increase fuel efficiency on your motorcycle

Poor  fuel mileage results in frequent stops at the gas pump, which translates into less money in your wallet.

Sometimes it takes a little detective work  to figure out where the problem is, and sometimes you can solve the problem yourself without taking the bike to a shop.

With gas prices reaching $4/ gallon and projected to go higher this summer, riders are looking for every possible way to make less stops at the gas pump.

#1 – You want to make sure you get gas at a pump that is accurate. Most pumps today are electronically configured and managed so they’re usually correct.  Basically this means to only stop at respectable gas stations and try to stay away from those old, outdated pumps that aren’t correctly managed.  Many states have agencies that inspect gas pumps and certify their accuracy.  Look for this sticker.

#2 –  Check the gas tank for small leaks. Before you crank up your bike, look on the floor for small puddles of gas. Most of the time you can see where the gas came from on the bike if you don’t move the bike. Hard-line cracks on the fuel tank are infamous on older tanks. Debris in the tank need to be cleaned out as well. Fixing Gas Tanks Guide You will also need to check the fuel lines for small holes.

#3 – Bad gas can clog  up the fuel injector or carburetor  and will reduce your fuel efficiency. Click here to find out how to clean your injector.

#4 – Nine times out of ten your motorcycle just isn’t getting proper combustion due to carbon build up in the engine. Air filters are the main air intake for the engine and if it’s clogged then the engine just can’t breath.  This will effect fuel efficiency as well and should be checked every time you change the oil.

#5  - Changing the oil and spark plugs are a basic necessity  with every vehicle but with your motorcycle there are several things you need to keep up with. Compression checks to make sure the piston rings are firing right, value clearance should be at manufactured specifics, clutch plate needs to be in good condition, chain should be tight not loose, wheel bearings,  and the brakes should be in good condition.

The rider is just as important when talking about fuel efficiency. Cold starting is the place where every rider puts the most wear and tear on the motorcycle. When starting the engine cold you never want to rev the engine excessively.  You also want to make sure you are changing gears at the correct speed and don’t rev the engine unnecessarily in-between gear changing or at the light. Ride easy for the first 5 miles and turning the engine of when having to stop for longer than a minute can help reduce wear and tear thus resulting in better fuel efficiency. Lastly, riding the clutch and depressing the brake while riding is the most common problem most riders do and most do it without even realizing it but this can cause major problems in fuel efficiency.

What about E85 fuel?  Avoid it.  Period.  Especially if your motorcycle will sit for a long period of time after filling up.   Motorcycles are not designed to run on ethanol blended fuel and cause all kinds of damage to internal components.  If you must fill up with E10 or E15 gas, make sure you use it up before parking your bike for longer than a couple days.  See more about ethanol and motorcycles here.

Ducati Recalls Over 3,000 Multistrada Cycles for Fuel Tank Problems

2003-2009 Multistrada's are being recalled.

DUCATI IS RECALLING certain model year 2006 MULTISTRADA 620,  2003-2006, MULTISTRADA 1000, and 2007-2009, MULTISTRADA 1100 motorcycles because of a potential fuel leak that can occur at the fuel tank pump flange seal.  Should a leak occur, the motorcycle could catch fire, resulting in a fatal crash.  Dealers will replace the fuel pump O ring with an updated part free of charge.   Ducati has not yet provided an owner notification schedule to NHTSA, however owners can contact Ductati at 800-231-6696 or the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration at 1-888-327-4236.   RECALL NO. RCL-10-005