TSUNAMI MOTORCYCLE TO BE PRESERVED BY H-D MUSEUM

Milwaukee (May 25, 2012) – A Harley-Davidson motorcycle recovered on the coast of British Columbia after drifting for more than a year and 4,000 miles across the Pacific Ocean following last year’s Japanese Tsunami will be preserved by the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee as a memorial to the tragedy that claimed more than 15,000 lives, in accordance with the wishes of its owner, Ikuo Yokoyama.

 The remarkable story of the 2004 FXSTB Softail Night Train motorcycle’s survival and recovery by Canadian Peter Mark made international headlines after he found it washed ashore on a remote beach on British Columbia’s Graham Island at low tide. Mark discovered the motorcycle, still bearing its Japanese license plate, along with several other items in the remains of an insulated cargo van container where the motorcycle was being stored by Yokoyama prior to the Tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011.

 Working with news agencies and representatives from Deeley Harley-Davidson Canadaand Harley-Davidson Japan, contact was made with 29-year-old Yokoyama, who lost his home and currently lives in temporary housing in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. Harley-Davidson offered to return his bike. But still struggling to rebuild his life in the aftermath of the disaster, Yokoyama respectfully declined. Although grateful for the offer to repatriate his motorcycle and touched by the outpouring of support from Harley riders around the world, Yokoyama requested to have it preserved in the Harley-Davidson Museum in honor of those whose lives were lost or forever changed by the disaster.

 “It is truly amazing that my Harley-Davidson motorcycle was recovered in Canada after drifting for more than a year,” said Yokoyama. “I would like to take this opportunity to express my heartfelt appreciation to Peter Mark, the finder of my motorcycle. Due to circumstances caused by the disaster, I have been so far unable to visit him in Canada to convey my gratitude.

 “Since the motorcycle was recovered, I have discussed with many people about what to do with it. I would be delighted if it could be preserved in its current condition and exhibited to the many visitors to the Harley-Davidson Museum as a memorial to a tragedy that claimed thousands of lives. I am very grateful to Harley-Davidson for offering me an opportunity to visit the museum, and I would like to do that when things have calmed down. At the same time, I would like to meet Peter, who recovered my motorcycle, to express my gratitude. Finally, I would like to thank all people around the world once again for their wholehearted support of the areas hit by the earthquake and Tsunami. I would like to ask them to help convey messages from the Japanese people about the tragedy of the Great East Japan Earthquake, which was a disaster of historic proportions.”

 “My heart really goes out to Ikuo Yokoyama and all the survivors of the Tōhoku earthquake and Tsunami for everything that was taken from them. I cannot even begin to comprehend the loss of family, friends and community,” said Mark. “I think it is fitting that the Harley which was swept across the Pacific Ocean by the Tsunami will end up in the Harley-Davidson Museum as a memorial to that tragic event. It has an interesting and powerful story to convey preserved in its current state.

 “I look forward to one day meeting Mr. Yokoyama face to face. I would also like to express my gratitude to all those that have taken part in the retrieval of the motorcycle, especially Ralph Tieleman, Steve Drane, and Deeley Harley-Davidson Canada.” 

 The motorcycle was recovered by Mark with the help of friends and transported toVictoria with support from Ralph Tieleman and Steve Drane of Steve Drane Harley-Davidson. It has since been transferred to Deeley H-D Canada in Vancouver. Plans for its transportation to and display at the Harley-Davidson Museum are being developed.

 “I’ve always felt Harley-Davidson motorcycles have a soul, and their owners obviously have an emotional attachment to their bikes. I just wanted to reunite this bike with its owner,” said Steve Drane of Steve Drane Harley-Davidson in Victoria, B.C.

 “The Harley-Davidson Museum is honored to receive this amazing motorcycle to ensure that its condition is preserved and can be displayed as a memorial to the Japan Tsunami tragedy,” said Bill Davidson, Vice President of the Harley-Davidson Museum.

 

Harley Stereotypes Come Out on Facebook

With Daytona’s Bike Week just a week away, Harley-Davidson wants to know, can you spot a biker?  Or more specifically the typical Harley-Davidson owner?  For the general public the stereotypical Harley owner is often much different from the reality and in HD’s new “No Cages” campaign, the following video puts real Harley riders in the spotlight, while challenging stereotypes and launching the new Seventy-Two Sportster model.

 Titled ‘E Pluribus Unum,’ or “out of many, one,” the new campaign is the first content born out of Harley-Davidson’s new crowd-sourcing Facebook application called Fan Machine.  Fan Machine allows Harley-Davidson’s 3.3 million Facebook fans to review an advertising brief, submit ideas and vote on submissions from other community members.

 The centerpiece of the new campaign is a series of digital videos featuring genuine Harley-Davidson riders and a corresponding stereotype showcased as a Twitter hashtag – “#StereotypicalHarley [fill in the blank].”  The ads are designed to start a conversation that will come alive in the social sphere through Harley-Davidson’s Web site and social platforms.

 “The beauty of the ‘E Pluribus Unum’ campaign is that it uses the element of surprise that exists in every Harley-Davidson owner to inspire people to think about riding our motorcycles,” said Scott Beck, Harley-Davidson’s General Manager of Marketing Operations for North America.

 The ‘E Pluribus Unum’ campaign is based on an idea submitted by Harold Chase, from Tukwila,Washington, through the Fan Machine and the riders were casted on Twitter. Harley-Davidson worked with existing marketing partners including Victors & Spoils, VSA Partners, Digitas and Sapient to bring the entirely digital campaign to life.

La Banda Announces Premiere Unique Documentary Celebrating Latino Motorcycling Culture

LOS ANGELES (April 18, 2011) –La Banda Films today announced the release of the documentary film, Harlistas: An American Journey, premiering April 2011. The film is directed by award-winning filmmaker Alfredo de Villa and follows the emotional journeys of real-life Harlistas – Harley riders of Latino heritage – as they seek adventure, camaraderie and achievement of the American Dream.

The documentary is the first of its kind to ever profile Latino motorcycling culture in the United States. The 90-minute film showcases four pivotal stories spanning Los Angeles to New York, the plains of South Dakota, the Pacific Coast and the Grand Canyon. Directed by Alfredo de Villa (Nothing Like the Holidays, Washington Heights), Harlistas: An American Journey brings to life Alfredo’s own passion for Latino culture and the iconic American motorcycle brand, Harley-Davidson.

“This documentary captures an unexplored terrain: the bond between Harlistas, their motorcycles and their families,” said de Villa. “Much more than the traditional historical or fictional narratives, this film charts new boundaries and is as fearless as Harley-Davidson itself.”

Harlistas: An American Journey is scheduled to premiere on Telemundo’s mun2, the fastest growing bilingual cable network in the U.S. among YLAs (young Latino Americans), on May 27, 2011, with additional airings on May 28 (Uni HD and mun2), July 29 (mun2) and July 30 (mun2). Prior to the network premiere, the film will be available first On Demand and to own via digital download beginning April 21, 2011.

The word Harlista has deep historic and cultural roots originating more than 50 years ago in Latin America among Latino motorcycle riders to proclaim their strong passion for the Harley-Davidson brand and the bonds shared between fellow riders. Being a Harlista is about overcoming obstacles, grabbing life by the handlebars and experiencing the camaraderie of the open road.

“Harley-Davidson has a long-standing history with Harlistas, and we were thrilled to help support Alfredo’s vision to create a film that celebrates Latino riders,” said Dino Bernacchi, marketing communications director for Harley-Davidson. “We hope that everyone who sees this film feels inspired to take the next step toward following their dreams.”

To learn more about the film and, please visit www.HarlistasFilm.com