House Bill Approved To Exempt Kids’ Off-Highway Vehicles From Lead Law

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The U.S. House has approved legislation by a vote of 421-2 to exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from the lead law that essentially bans the sale of those machines at the end of the year, the American Motorcyclist Association reports.

On Aug. 1, Reps. Mary Mack Bono (R-Calif.) and G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) introduced H.R. 2715 to grant the exemption. The measure earned House approval later in the day and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

The Senate is considering similar legislation — S. 1448, the Consumer Product Safety Flexibility Act of 2011.

“This is excellent news for families around the nation who enjoy responsible motorized recreation,” said Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO. “Now the challenge will be to get our federal lawmakers to agree on one version of the bill and to send it to President Obama to be signed into law.

“It is vital that a lead-law exemption for OHVs be signed into law not only because it will once again allow families to enjoy riding together, but also so that children aren’t forced to ride adult-sized machines that they may not be able to operate safely,” Dingman said.

The legislation exempts OHVs — including kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) — from the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The CPSIA was designed to ban small toys with high lead content. But because of broadly written language in the law, it has been interpreted to apply to all products for kids 12 and under, including dirtbikes, ATVs, bicycles, clothing and books.

The AMA has been at the forefront of the fight to exclude child-sized motorcycles and ATVs from the CPSIA for more than two years. The association has participated in news events to focus media attention on the issue, lobbied on Capitol Hill, and organized campaigns to encourage riders and parents to contact their federal lawmakers and key decision-makers to exempt kids’ OHVs from the CPSIA.

As a result, every single member of Congress, as well as members of the CPSC, has received powerful statements from members of the AMA and the All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA), which is a partner organization of the AMA.

The AMA continues these efforts through its “Kids Just Want to Ride” campaign. To get involved, and to see more of what the AMA has done for the past two years in its efforts to exempt kids’ OHVs from the CPSIA, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/KeepKidMotorcyclesAndATVsLegal.aspx

75 Federal Lawmakers Now Support Kids Just Want to Ride Act

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — A bill that would exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from a law that effectively bans their sale at the end of the year is gaining more support in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Seventy-five U.S. House members now support the bill — H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) — that would exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content portion of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

“The Kids Just Want To Ride Act has broad bipartisan support, but that’s not why it deserves to become a law,” Rehberg said. “It deserves to become a law because it’s good policy that will keep kids safe and preserve jobs. There are plenty of things to argue about in Congress, but keeping kids safe by allowing them to ride on kid-sized motorcycles, ATVs and snowmobiles shouldn’t be one of them.”

Rep. Michael Burgess, M.D. (R-Texas), who is co-chairman of the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus and a co-signor of H.R. 412, also stressed the safety aspects of the bill.

“As a medical doctor, I know how important safety is and [I] am pleased to hear that 75 members of Congress have now co-sponsored this important legislation,” Burgess said. “Bills like the Kids Just Want to Ride Act demonstrate that Congress can provide flexibility for companies while ensuring safety for consumers.”

H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, is aimed squarely at the CPSIA, which is commonly known as the lead law. The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part.

The CPSIA also requires that all childrens’ products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed, the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) will effectively be banned.

“Many lawmakers on Capitol Hill recognize that a common-sense solution is needed to solve the problems created by the CPSIA so that families can continue to enjoy responsible outdoor motorized recreation,” said Rick Podliska, AMA Washington representative. “And almost daily, more and more lawmakers are recognizing that H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, offers that common-sense solution.”

The latest flood of support for the Kids Just Want to Ride Act follows a day of lobbying by kids and their parents who descended on Washington, D.C., in late May as part of the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb lobbying effort. The children, dressed in motocross gear, and their parents shared their stories about enjoying responsible motorized recreation, and the need to change the CPSIA, in discussions with lawmakers and congressional staff members.

Podliska noted, however, that some lawmakers may still be unaware of H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act. He is urging anyone concerned about the future of off-highway riding for youth to contact their federal lawmakers and ask them to support H.R. 412.

The easiest way to contact your lawmaker on the issue is to go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/IssuesLegislation.aspx

Federal Funding Language Would Block ‘lead law’ Enforcement

"Small businesses that sell small off-highway vehicles also suffer under the CPSIA," he said. "For the safety of children, and for the health of small businesses, the AMA strongly urges the adoption of this language."

PICKERINGTON, Ohio –A key federal agency can’t enforce a ban on the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) under language inserted into a federal government funding measure in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

On June 16, Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) got language inserted into the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill for the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, that prevents the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) from using money to enforce lead-content limits on kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs).

The limits are contained in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is known as the lead law.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products to undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the CPSC, which is responsible for implementing the law.

Kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs contain amounts of lead that exceed the parts-per-million levels allowed under the CPSIA.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill provides annual funding for several key federal government agencies, including the CPSC. If the full House eventually adopts the language, then it still needs to clear the Senate before the bill goes to the president to be signed into law.

“While the original legislation was intended to keep kids safe from lead content in toys, the overreaching enforcement wound up putting them at risk by forcing them to use larger, more dangerous machines that are intended only for adults,” said Rehberg, who is a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

“While I’m working on a permanent fix to get rid of this dangerous regulation, my appropriations language will buy more time,” he said.

Rehberg was referring to H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, which he introduced to exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content restrictions of the CPSIA.

Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO, thanked Rehberg for his efforts.

“This language is an important step in efforts to lift the ban on the sale of kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs imposed by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008,” Dingman said. “America’s young riders need to be able to ride appropriately sized machines to help them stay safe. If those machines aren’t available, then they may ride bigger machines that may be difficult for them to control.

To urge your federal lawmakers to support the Rehberg language in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill, and to support H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/rights/issueslegislation

50 lawmakers now support The Kids Just Want to Ride Act

Congress Needs to Clarify Lead Ban Provision in Bill

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Legislation that would exempt kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) from the “lead law” that effectively bans them at the end of the year is gaining momentum on Capitol Hill, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

There are now 50 co-sponsors to H.R. 412: The Kids Just Want to Ride Act, which was introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) The bill seeks to exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is also known as the lead law.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

“As a motorcycling enthusiast myself for many years, I fully respect the importance of improving the safety of kids who ride off-highway motorcycles and ATVs,” said Rep. Reid Ribble (R-Wis.), one of the latest co-sponsors. “But this is just another example of regulations creating the exact opposite effect of their original intent. This law actually makes kids less safe by eliminating appropriately sized off-highway motorcycles and ATVs, and forces young riders onto larger and more powerful machines not designed for them.

“I’m proud to support the Kids Just Want to Ride Act and know that it will keep youth-sized motorcycles and ATVs available for safe and responsible use as they are intended,” Ribble said.

Rep. Jeff Landry (R-La.), another co-sponsor, said: “The Kids Just Want to Ride Act will fix the illogical mandate of the Consumer Product Safety Commission and will once again allow our children to safely enjoy outdoor recreational vehicles. I am proud to be a co-sponsor of this common-sense legislation to protect our youth while working to create jobs.”

Ed Moreland, AMA senior vice president for government relations, thanked lawmakers for their bipartisan backing of the bill. He noted it’s important to get as many co-sponsors as possible to increase the bill’s chances of passage.

Moreland urged all concerned riders and parents to contact their federal lawmakers to ask for support.

The easiest way to contact lawmakers is through the Rights section of the AMA website at AmericanMotorcyclist.com.

In addition to Ribble and Landry, the latest co-sponsors of the Kids Just Want to Ride bill include Reps. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.), Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), Joe Courtney (D-Conn.), Mark Critz (D-Pa.), Lynn Jenkins (R-Kan.), John Kline (R-Minn.), Tom Latham (R-Iowa), Pete Olson (R-Texas), Marlin Stutzman (R-Ind.), Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) and Joe Wilson (R-S.C.).

For more information, go to http://capwiz.com/amacycle/go/HR412