Indian Motorcycle reveals Spirit of Munro short film

Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 4Hello to my friends in the Powersports Industry. One of my most proud career moments is upon us – the release of a short film that captures the enthusiasm, work ethic and commitment by those connected to the Indian Motorcycle brand through the Spirit of Munro tribute motorcycle. Below you will find links to the film itself as well as a behind the scenes mini documentary that lets you visit with some of the amazingly creative people behind this work.

I must give credit and the utmost respect to my friends who made this project possible. As I have managed the program and proudly unveiled it in Daytona Beach in March, it has grown to be seen and appreciated at an International level and has been lauded with many kind words and the support of Indian Motorcycle fans. Jeb Scolman of Jeb’s Metal and Speed in Long Beach California was tasked to build this machine around a prototype Thunder Stroke 111. Jeb did so with three solid months of 18 hour days, taking only Christmas day off, building a truly stunning tribute machine to Burt Munro and the spirit of those who choose to do rather than just watch from the sidelines. It’s a remarkable piece of work that must be seen to be appreciated. It will be on display in Sturgis this summer as we launch the new Indian Chief.

Also requiring credit are Polaris Industries media team members David Shelleny and Mark Nevils who took on pushing the film project through Polaris Industries. Commitment is one thing – but it takes money to make something as beautiful as this film – and they asked favors of suppliers and pushed our managers for final approval and a budget – the results are worth putting their necks on the line as you will see. Adam Brummond and the crew from The Factory did an outstanding job in interpreting our shared vision in the final piece, also calling favors and assembling a committed, talented and rugged crew. Credit Barry Hathaway for some remarkable photos and his own commitment to the project as he documented the secret build for months as well as shot the images of the bike in motion. Todd Eagan accepted the challenge of riding the untested bike on the dry lake. The first time power was applied in gear was on that dry lake. Jeb’s work shone through as the bike tracked perfectly straight. While we certainly were not going for high speeds for the film – Todd told me after two runs “It’s perfect and man does she want to GO!” We estimate speeds on subsequent runs just topping 100 miles per hour. And yes, there is plenty left.

Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 2 Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 6 Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 7 Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 10 Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 14 with Jeb Scolman Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 18 Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 21 With Todd Eagan and Jeb Scolman Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 23 Todd Eagan Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 33 With Robert Pandya Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 34 with Robert Pandya and Todd Eagan Photo Credit Barry Hathaway - SoM 37 Robert Pandya This complete film project was shot in only two days. It took guts to makes the commitments, skill to tell the story and faith in people that it would represent what is truly a key piece in the long history of motorcycling. This is the first motorcycle to be publically seen powered by the Thunder Stroke 111, and the Spirit of Munro film captures the legacy of this great brand while pushing it forward to the future.  – Robert Pandya

Indian Announces 2012 Models and Pricing

When Polaris Industries bought the iconic Indian brand in April of this year it was wildly speculated that Polaris would introduce sweeping changes to the marquee.  At the dealer meeting the new models were unveiled and there were very few changes evident.  This wasn’t surprising to industry watchers.  It takes time to overhaul designs.  Major engine architecture modifications, if that’s the direction Polaris is going, won’t be seen for at least another year.

Gone is the Indian RoadMaster, and there’s no Indian Scout, despite internet rumors to the contrary.

Yet with only three new models, there is little doubt they’ve felt the strong hand of legendary Polaris engineering.  Behind the scenes in the areas of quality, fit and finish these 2012 models are sure to be vastly improved  across the board.

Pictures and More after the poll

Retail prices have remained somewhat constant from last year.  The Vintage Chief starts at $35,999 and tops out at $36,899.  The Indian Chief Classic retails at $26,499 and the Indian Chief Darkhorse is just shy of $28,000.

Additionally for the first model year under this new stewardship, the inaugural motorcycles will be numbered to 110 – signifying the years since the Indian Motorcycle brand was born. These numbered motorcycles will be highly collectible with badges and certificates authenticating the historical significance of the first production run of bikes under Polaris ownership.

 

 

 

 

Hall of Fame Supporter Wins 1973 Kawasaki Z1 and 2010 Z1000 in Motorcycle Hall of Fame Raffle

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — When he was growing up in the late 1970s, riding a Kawasaki KZ650, Scott Carey from Pecatonica, Ill., considered the 903cc Kawasaki Z1 the quintessential superbike of its day. Now, 40 years later, the Motorcycle Hall of Fame supporter has his dream bike. Carey won a restored 1973 Kawasaki Z1, as well as a new Kawasaki Z1000, in the 2011 Motorcycle Hall of Fame raffle on Saturday, July 23.

Carey’s winning ticket was drawn by event Grand Marshal and Hall of Famer Jeff Fredette during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days featuring Kawasaki, Marque of the Year at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio.

“When I was growing up, the Z1 was the big boy,” Carey said. “I was talking to a friend about getting one just a few weeks ago. And the Z1000, just this spring I was looking at that as a new bike. This is just great. I’m very excited to win both of these bikes.”

Carey said that he donates to the Hall of Fame regularly, and considers the tickets another way of supporting the organization’s mission to preserve the rich tradition of motorcycling in America.

“I really think the Hall of Fame is a fantastic idea,” said Carey. “You never really expect to win these things. It’s good to support the Hall of Fame. It’s something that has to be done. Motorcycling is a big part of history.”

Carey, who competes in amateur roadracing, said that his Z1 — which has been expertly restored by Johnny’s Vintage Motorcycle Company — will probably see a few miles, but, for the most part, “it’s going to be added to the collection and admired.”

While Carey prepares to enjoy his Z1 and Z1000, Hall of Fame supporters can start planning for next year with the newly announced 2012 raffle bike, a stunning 1947 Indian Chief. The Indian Chief is an iconic masterpiece of Americana, representing not just America’s longtime love for big V-twin motorcycles, but riders’ passion for the open road. The winner will be selected at a drawing at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in July 2012.

A minimum donation of $5 per ticket, or $20 for five tickets, is suggested. Donations can be made online at MotorcycleMuseum.org

or by phone at (614) 856-2222.

About the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation
Founded in 1990 by the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, the goal of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame is to tell the stories and preserve the history of motorcycling. Located on the campus of the American Motorcyclist Association in Pickerington, Ohio, the Hall of Fame’s three major exhibition halls feature the machines and memorabilia of those who have contributed notably to the sport. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to motorcycling, including those known for their contributions to road riding, off-road riding and all categories of racing, as well as those who have excelled in business, history, design and engineering. More information can be found atMotorcycleMuseum.org

Roadsmith Introduces Indian Trike Conversion

White Bear Lake, MN ( May 25, 2011)- The unmistakable look of the Indian Motorcycle has been turning heads for over a 110 years and the Indian Chief has always been the most iconic of the tribe. It was with this in mind that legendary trike company, Roadsmith Trikes, took on this model as their newest design and initial foray into this brand of motorcycle trike conversion.

Following Indian’s recent sale to Polaris Industries, it’s a sure bet that this brand will receive a much needed boost from its new owners and, quite possibly, a return to its former popularity and status. Knowing this, Roadsmith’s design team went to great lengths to capture every nuance of the design and personality of this easily recognizable motorcycling legend.

With its swooping rear fenders and graceful lines, this new trike design continues the look and feel of the original while, at the same time, creating a comfortable and utilitarian three-wheeled version. Complete with a spacious trunk (requiring only one hand to open) and fully independent suspension, this new model offers all of the comfort and convenience one would expect from a Roadsmith.  Options include the company’s proprietary AccuRideTM Automatic Leveling Suspension System, as well as a host of other convenient and stylish options and accessories.

 

Roadsmith Trikes is based in White Bear Lake, MN where it manufactures and distributes twelve different trike conversion kits for Honda, Harley-Davidson and now Indian motorcycles. They are also represented by over a hundred dealers in the U.S. and Canada as well as their own retail locations, The Trike Shop at Destination Daytona and on Beach Street in Daytona Beach, FL.