AMA Hall of Famer Sen. Nighthorse Campbell Hauling White House Christmas Tree Across Country

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Former Colorado U.S. Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, a member of the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, is behind the wheel of a Mack truck hauling the nation’s 2012 Capitol Christmas Tree from Colorado to Washington, D.C., the American Motorcyclist Association reports.

“It is a privilege to drive the tree for the U.S. Capitol from Colorado this year,” said Campbell, who was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2001. Campbell, an avid motorcyclist, represented Colorado in Congress from 1993 to 2005.

Choose Outdoors, a national nonprofit coalition for outdoor recreation, is coordinating the 2012 Capitol Christmas Tree tour with the White River National Forest, where the 73-foot-tall Colorado Engleman spruce tree was harvested.

The almost-four-week-long trip began in Meeker, Colo., where the tree was harvested from the White River National Forest in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. On the way to Washington, D.C., the tree is scheduled to stop in cities and towns in Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas, Missouri, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

The custom-decorated Mack truck used to haul the tree was fitted with a special cradle to support the tree’s branches.

The AMA and AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame are urging motorcyclists along the route to greet Campbell and the tree during its journey.

The next stop is in Denver from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11, at the Midtown Development at 6700 Pecos St. The AMA will post route updates on its Facebook page at www.facebook.com/AmericanMotorcyclist.

To learn more about the 2012 Capitol Christmas Tree tour, go to www.capitolchristmastree2012.org.

House Bill Approved To Exempt Kids’ Off-Highway Vehicles From Lead Law

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The U.S. House has approved legislation by a vote of 421-2 to exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from the lead law that essentially bans the sale of those machines at the end of the year, the American Motorcyclist Association reports.

On Aug. 1, Reps. Mary Mack Bono (R-Calif.) and G.K. Butterfield (D-N.C.) introduced H.R. 2715 to grant the exemption. The measure earned House approval later in the day and now goes to the Senate for consideration.

The Senate is considering similar legislation — S. 1448, the Consumer Product Safety Flexibility Act of 2011.

“This is excellent news for families around the nation who enjoy responsible motorized recreation,” said Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO. “Now the challenge will be to get our federal lawmakers to agree on one version of the bill and to send it to President Obama to be signed into law.

“It is vital that a lead-law exemption for OHVs be signed into law not only because it will once again allow families to enjoy riding together, but also so that children aren’t forced to ride adult-sized machines that they may not be able to operate safely,” Dingman said.

The legislation exempts OHVs — including kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) — from the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The CPSIA was designed to ban small toys with high lead content. But because of broadly written language in the law, it has been interpreted to apply to all products for kids 12 and under, including dirtbikes, ATVs, bicycles, clothing and books.

The AMA has been at the forefront of the fight to exclude child-sized motorcycles and ATVs from the CPSIA for more than two years. The association has participated in news events to focus media attention on the issue, lobbied on Capitol Hill, and organized campaigns to encourage riders and parents to contact their federal lawmakers and key decision-makers to exempt kids’ OHVs from the CPSIA.

As a result, every single member of Congress, as well as members of the CPSC, has received powerful statements from members of the AMA and the All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA), which is a partner organization of the AMA.

The AMA continues these efforts through its “Kids Just Want to Ride” campaign. To get involved, and to see more of what the AMA has done for the past two years in its efforts to exempt kids’ OHVs from the CPSIA, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/KeepKidMotorcyclesAndATVsLegal.aspx

Hall of Fame Supporter Wins 1973 Kawasaki Z1 and 2010 Z1000 in Motorcycle Hall of Fame Raffle

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — When he was growing up in the late 1970s, riding a Kawasaki KZ650, Scott Carey from Pecatonica, Ill., considered the 903cc Kawasaki Z1 the quintessential superbike of its day. Now, 40 years later, the Motorcycle Hall of Fame supporter has his dream bike. Carey won a restored 1973 Kawasaki Z1, as well as a new Kawasaki Z1000, in the 2011 Motorcycle Hall of Fame raffle on Saturday, July 23.

Carey’s winning ticket was drawn by event Grand Marshal and Hall of Famer Jeff Fredette during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days featuring Kawasaki, Marque of the Year at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio.

“When I was growing up, the Z1 was the big boy,” Carey said. “I was talking to a friend about getting one just a few weeks ago. And the Z1000, just this spring I was looking at that as a new bike. This is just great. I’m very excited to win both of these bikes.”

Carey said that he donates to the Hall of Fame regularly, and considers the tickets another way of supporting the organization’s mission to preserve the rich tradition of motorcycling in America.

“I really think the Hall of Fame is a fantastic idea,” said Carey. “You never really expect to win these things. It’s good to support the Hall of Fame. It’s something that has to be done. Motorcycling is a big part of history.”

Carey, who competes in amateur roadracing, said that his Z1 — which has been expertly restored by Johnny’s Vintage Motorcycle Company — will probably see a few miles, but, for the most part, “it’s going to be added to the collection and admired.”

While Carey prepares to enjoy his Z1 and Z1000, Hall of Fame supporters can start planning for next year with the newly announced 2012 raffle bike, a stunning 1947 Indian Chief. The Indian Chief is an iconic masterpiece of Americana, representing not just America’s longtime love for big V-twin motorcycles, but riders’ passion for the open road. The winner will be selected at a drawing at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days in July 2012.

A minimum donation of $5 per ticket, or $20 for five tickets, is suggested. Donations can be made online at MotorcycleMuseum.org

or by phone at (614) 856-2222.

About the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation
Founded in 1990 by the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, the goal of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame is to tell the stories and preserve the history of motorcycling. Located on the campus of the American Motorcyclist Association in Pickerington, Ohio, the Hall of Fame’s three major exhibition halls feature the machines and memorabilia of those who have contributed notably to the sport. The Motorcycle Hall of Fame recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to motorcycling, including those known for their contributions to road riding, off-road riding and all categories of racing, as well as those who have excelled in business, history, design and engineering. More information can be found atMotorcycleMuseum.org

Lawmakers Told That Local Communities Should Decide Land Uses

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Supporters of H.R. 1581 — the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act of 2011 — told U.S. lawmakers on July 26 that the bill would allow local communities to decide the proper uses of 43 million acres of protected public land, which could include off-highway riding, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

But critics opposed releasing the protected land all at once. Instead, they want Congress to release the land on a piecemeal basis.

The statements were made during a U.S. House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands hearing on H.R. 1581, the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act of 2011. The measure would remove the stringent use restrictions on almost 6.7 million acres managed by the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and on 36.1 million acres of U.S. Forest Service (USFS) land that was evaluated for strict congressional Wilderness land-use designations.

A Wilderness designation is one of the strictest forms of public land management. Once Congress designates an area as Wilderness, nearly all forms of non-pedestrian recreation are illegal, including off-highway vehicle (OHV) and bicycle riding.

The AMA supports appropriate Wilderness designations that meet the criteria established by Congress in 1964, but anti-OHV forces have been abusing legislative and administrative processes in repeated attempts to ban responsible OHV recreation on public land.

The BLM and USFS have determined the 43 million acres covered by H.R. 1581 aren’t suitable for Wilderness designation, but because of various laws and rules they must continue to strictly manage the land until Congress releases it for other possible uses.

The Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act would release the land, freeing up land managers to determine new uses, if any, such as allowing responsible OHV recreation where it currently isn’t allowed.

U.S. Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who was joined by other lawmakers in introducing the bill, said the measure “simply acts on recommendations made by the federal government and returns the management of tens of millions of acres of public land to local communities so that more Americans can have access to our public lands.

“These communities know best how to manage the lands, whether for increased recreation, preservation or development,” he said.

U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) echoed McCarthy’s comments.

“As chairman of the Congressional Western Caucus, I am proud to be an original co-sponsor of this important piece of legislation,” Pearce said. “H.R. 1581 is good for the West and good for America. It will allow more Americans to enjoy our federal lands, and allow us to actually protect the habitats of wildlife through proper land management.”

But BLM Director Robert Abbey, who opposed the bill, testified that even though the land didn’t earn an endorsement for Wilderness designation before, it might now.

“These recommendations are now 20 years old, and the on-the-ground work associated with them is as much as 30 years old,” Abbey said. “During that time in a number of places, resource conditions have changed, our understanding of mineral resources has changed, and public opinion has changed.

“If these suitability recommendations were made today, many of them would undoubtedly be different,” he said.

The 43 million acres have been locked up for years, if not decades, even though federal land managers have noted the land doesn’t qualify for the very restrictive Wilderness designation. AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska wondered how the land could qualify for Wilderness designation now when it was deemed unsuitable 20 or 30 years ago.

“For years, groups hoping to keep responsible off-highway riders off public land have been able to get areas earmarked for possible inclusion in the nation’s Wilderness system, which immediately bars off-highway riding, bicycling and almost all other activities while the Wilderness study is under way,” Podliska said.

“We commend Rep. Kevin McCarthy for introducing H.R. 1581, the Wilderness and Roadless Area Release Act, and Chairman Rob Bishop for holding a hearing on this bill,” he said. “The hearing illustrated why this bill is necessary and that all Americans should be able to enjoy our federal lands.

“The actions taken by the current Congress could have a profound impact on the ability of responsible off-highway riders to use public land,” Podliska continued. “It’s important that all responsible riders stay informed about Wilderness bills in Congress, and take action, when necessary, to help protect their right to ride.”

The best way to stay informed is to sign up for AMA email Action Alerts at http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/GetInvolved/ActionAlertSignUp.aspx

Rare Aermacchi/Harley-Davidsons Headed to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days Featuring Kawasaki, Marque of the Year

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The list of rare and historically significant Aermacchi/Harley-Davidson motorcycles that will be on display at this year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days featuring Kawasaki, Marque of the Year, continues to grow, with a championship winning RR 250 heading the bill for the July 22-24 event at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio.

“We’ve got some great bikes,” said John Basore of the Aermacchi-based group that is serving as this year’s AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days Classic Club. “I’ve probably got one of every racer Aermacchi ever had lined up.”

Every year at AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, the Classic Club display rounds out an exciting experience for vintage fans, many of whom will be attending to honor Kawasaki as the Marque of the Year. Aermacchi Harley-Davidsons, sold in the 1960s and ’70s, were the result of a unusual partnership between the quintessentially American motorcycle company and a small-bore Italian bike brand that introduced thousands of new riders to the Harley-Davidson name.

“At the time, Aermacchis may have seemed like an unusual choice to put in Harley-Davidson dealerships,” Basore says. “But the fact is that, when AMF bought Harley-Davidson, it allowed Aermacchi to win world championships for the Harley-Davidson Motor Co. That’s most impressive.”

The RR250 is a water-cooled two-stroke, twin-cylinder roadracer with a cassette transmission, an eccentric swingarm adjuster, dual front disc brakes and a full fairing. “It was comparable in every way to the best Yamaha of that time period,” Bashore said.

In addition to the RR 250, bikes planned for display include: a 1965 250CR, a ’65 250CRTT, a ’67 250H, a ’69 350SS, a ’70 350SS, a ’76 SS250, a ’78 MX 250, a ’73 SR100 and an all-original 1961 250C Sprint-one of the first models imported.

AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days will also feature other activities celebrating Kawasaki as the 2011 Marque of the Year. These include displays, demo rides, seminars and autograph signings. Grand Marshal Jeff Fredette, a multi-time national and international off-road champion, will be on hand to reminisce and sign autographs, as well as compete in several vintage racing classes. Enthusiasts will also have an opportunity to win a new Kawasaki Z1000 and a classic Z1, given away together in a single raffle that benefits the Motorcycle Hall of Fame.

Held at the world-class Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days includes vintage and post-vintage competition in motocross, trials, hare scrambles, roadracing and dirt track. The three-day event will also feature North America’s largest motorcycle swap meet, bike shows, demo rides of current production bikes, motorcycling seminars, the new product Manufacturers’ Midway, and club corrals featuring marque and regional clubs.

Proceeds from AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days benefit the Motorcycle Hall of Fame, which is located on the campus of the AMA in Pickerington, Ohio. The mission of the Hall of Fame is to celebrate, elucidate and preserve the rich tradition of motorcycling in America. Its exhibits honor the distinguished men and women whose competitive spirit, passion, vision and entrepreneurship have played a vital role in shaping the sport, lifestyle and business of motorcycling. For more information, call (614) 856-2222, or visit the Hall of Fame’s website at MotorcycleMuseum.org

Tickets to AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days can be purchased online at MidOhio.com

For more information about the event, visit AMAVintageMotorcycleDays.com

 

 

American Motorcyclist Association Wants Motorcycles Included in Study of Ethanol-Blended Fuel

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) is asking a key U.S. House panel to include motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) in any future study of ethanol-blended gasoline.

In a letter sent July 11 to the House Energy and Environment Subcommittee, the AMA, along with its partner organization, the All-Terrain Vehicle Association (ATVA), urged subcommittee Chairman Andy Harris (R-Md.) “that on- or off-highway motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) be part of any scientific study by the NAS” related to ethanol-blended gasoline. NAS stands for the National Academy of Sciences.

The subcommittee held a hearing on July 7 entitled “Hitting the Ethanol Blend Wall: Examining the Science on E15.” The hearing focused on E15, a new gasoline formulation that contains up to 15 percent alcohol by volume. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in October 2010 approved the use of E15 in model year 2007 and newer light-duty vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles). In January 2011, the EPA added model year 2001-2006 light-duty vehicles to the approved list.

No on- or off-highway motorcycles or ATVs are currently approved.

At its hearing, the subcommittee indicated that it may require the EPA to arrange with the NAS to study a full range of issues related to E15.

In the letter, AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska said the AMA and ATVA have concerns about: E15 being put in motorcycles or ATVs mistakenly and damaging engines; the continued availability of gasoline that has no ethanol, or gasoline with only a 10 percent blend that is safe for use in motorcycles and ATVs; the possibility that “blender pumps” — which dispense multiple grades of gasoline through a single hose — could introduce enough ethanol into gasoline to be used in a motorcycle or ATV to damage the vehicle; and that ethanol absorbs water, which could be harmful to motorcycles and ATVs.

“In conclusion, to address our concerns, the AMA and ATVA urge that on- or off-highway motorcycles and ATVs be part of any scientific study by NAS,” Podliska wrote. “Not only should the study focus on the short- and long-term impacts on vehicles and engines, but should consider financial implications of increased ethanol use in gasoline on consumers; fuel producers, distributors and retailers; vehicle and engine manufacturers, dealers and service facilities; and the environment.”

To read the letter, click here:http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Federal/Harris_NAS_Ethanol_7-11-2011.sflb.ashx?download=true

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About the American Motorcyclist Association
Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle. AMA members come from all walks of life, and they navigate many different routes on their journey to the same destination: freedom on two wheels. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights organization, the AMA advocates for motorcyclists’ interests in the halls of local, state and federal government, the committees of international governing organizations, and the court of public opinion. Through member clubs, promoters and partners, the AMA sanctions more motorsports competition and motorcycle recreational events than any other organization in the world. AMA members receive money-saving discounts from dozens of well-known suppliers of motorcycle services, gear and apparel, bike rental, transport, hotel stays and more. Through its support of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum, the AMA preserves the heritage of motorcycling for future generations. For more information, please visit AmericanMotorcyclist.com

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American Motorcyclist Association Raises Questions About New Federal Transportation Bill

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) is asking some pointed questions related to motorcycling priorities following a news conference by a powerful U.S. House committee chairman.

Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, held a news conference on July 7 to roll out some of the priorities that he intends to include in his forthcoming proposed national transportation bill. If it is introduced, approved by the full Congress and signed into law by the president, the bill would guide federal transportation spending for the next six years.

Mica’s proposal would spend only $230 billion, far less than the $566 billion sought by President Obama’s administration.

In a letter to Mica dated July 11, AMA Washington Representative Rick Podliska outlined the AMA’s position on a variety of issues crucial to motorcyclists and asked several questions in light of the proposed spending cuts.

For example, Podliska asked whether Mica’s proposal would: bar states from using federal funds for motorcycle-only traffic checkpoints; continue to prohibit lobbying at the state level by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA); continue to designate funds for motorcycle rider education and awareness programs; and continue the Recreational Trails Program (RTP) which uses a modest amount of the revenue collected from fuel taxes paid by off-highway riders to help pay for state trail projects.

AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman has previously stated that abolishing the RTP program would effectively create a tax increase on off-highway riders (OHV) because the RTP funds would no longer be designated for a program that benefits motorized users.

Podliska also noted that Mica, during his news conference, discussed “performance measures” as a way to improve state highway safety efforts. Podliska asked whether performance measures would be applied to states with high motorcycle crash rates so that those states would be required to spend more federal funding to reduce the number of crashes.

In addition, Podliska wrote that Mica appeared to be pushing for more public-private partnerships. Podliska asked whether Mica’s proposals would, for example, require private companies operating public roads to continue to allow motorcycles to use those roads.

To read the letter, click here:http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Federal/7_11_11_Chairman_Mica_MC_Priorities_Letter.sflb.ashx?download=true

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75 Federal Lawmakers Now Support Kids Just Want to Ride Act

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – A bill that would exempt kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs) from a law that effectively bans their sale at the end of the year is gaining more support in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Seventy-five U.S. House members now support the bill — H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, introduced by Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) — that would exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content portion of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008.

“The Kids Just Want To Ride Act has broad bipartisan support, but that’s not why it deserves to become a law,” Rehberg said. “It deserves to become a law because it’s good policy that will keep kids safe and preserve jobs. There are plenty of things to argue about in Congress, but keeping kids safe by allowing them to ride on kid-sized motorcycles, ATVs and snowmobiles shouldn’t be one of them.”

Rep. Michael Burgess, M.D. (R-Texas), who is co-chairman of the Congressional Motorcycle Caucus and a co-signor of H.R. 412, also stressed the safety aspects of the bill.

“As a medical doctor, I know how important safety is and [I] am pleased to hear that 75 members of Congress have now co-sponsored this important legislation,” Burgess said. “Bills like the Kids Just Want to Ride Act demonstrate that Congress can provide flexibility for companies while ensuring safety for consumers.”

H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, is aimed squarely at the CPSIA, which is commonly known as the lead law. The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part.

The CPSIA also requires that all childrens’ products undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is responsible for implementing the law.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed, the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) will effectively be banned.

“Many lawmakers on Capitol Hill recognize that a common-sense solution is needed to solve the problems created by the CPSIA so that families can continue to enjoy responsible outdoor motorized recreation,” said Rick Podliska, AMA Washington representative. “And almost daily, more and more lawmakers are recognizing that H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, offers that common-sense solution.”

The latest flood of support for the Kids Just Want to Ride Act follows a day of lobbying by kids and their parents who descended on Washington, D.C., in late May as part of the AMA Family Capitol Hill Climb lobbying effort. The children, dressed in motocross gear, and their parents shared their stories about enjoying responsible motorized recreation, and the need to change the CPSIA, in discussions with lawmakers and congressional staff members.

Podliska noted, however, that some lawmakers may still be unaware of H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act. He is urging anyone concerned about the future of off-highway riding for youth to contact their federal lawmakers and ask them to support H.R. 412.

The easiest way to contact your lawmaker on the issue is to go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/IssuesLegislation.aspx

Federal Funding Language Would Block ‘lead law’ Enforcement

"Small businesses that sell small off-highway vehicles also suffer under the CPSIA," he said. "For the safety of children, and for the health of small businesses, the AMA strongly urges the adoption of this language."

PICKERINGTON, Ohio –A key federal agency can’t enforce a ban on the sale of kids’ dirtbikes and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) under language inserted into a federal government funding measure in Congress, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

On June 16, Rep. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.) got language inserted into the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill for the next fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1, that prevents the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) from using money to enforce lead-content limits on kids’ off-highway vehicles (OHVs).

The limits are contained in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, which is known as the lead law.

The CPSIA bans the making, importing, distributing or selling of any product intended for children 12 and under that contains more than a specified amount of lead in any accessible part. It also requires all children’s products to undergo periodic testing by independent laboratories approved by the CPSC, which is responsible for implementing the law.

Kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs contain amounts of lead that exceed the parts-per-million levels allowed under the CPSIA.

The CPSC has delayed enforcing key portions of the law until after the end of the year. Unless the CPSIA is changed by then, the sale of child-sized dirtbikes and ATVs will effectively be banned.

The Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill provides annual funding for several key federal government agencies, including the CPSC. If the full House eventually adopts the language, then it still needs to clear the Senate before the bill goes to the president to be signed into law.

“While the original legislation was intended to keep kids safe from lead content in toys, the overreaching enforcement wound up putting them at risk by forcing them to use larger, more dangerous machines that are intended only for adults,” said Rehberg, who is a member of the House Appropriations Committee.

“While I’m working on a permanent fix to get rid of this dangerous regulation, my appropriations language will buy more time,” he said.

Rehberg was referring to H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, which he introduced to exempt kids’ OHVs from the lead-content restrictions of the CPSIA.

Rob Dingman, AMA president and CEO, thanked Rehberg for his efforts.

“This language is an important step in efforts to lift the ban on the sale of kid-sized dirtbikes and ATVs imposed by the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008,” Dingman said. “America’s young riders need to be able to ride appropriately sized machines to help them stay safe. If those machines aren’t available, then they may ride bigger machines that may be difficult for them to control.

To urge your federal lawmakers to support the Rehberg language in the House Financial Services and General Government Appropriations bill, and to support H.R. 412, the Kids Just Want to Ride Act, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/rights/issueslegislation

Maine Adopts Practical Test for Measuring Motorcycle Sound

Since 1924, the AMA has protected the future of motorcycling and promoted the motorcycle lifestyle.

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Maine has adopted a simple yet reliable testing procedure that allows motorcyclists to prove their bikes don’t violate Maine’s motor vehicle sound law, the American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) reports.

Under a new law that went into effect on May 26, motorcyclists ticketed for excessive sound emitting from their motorcycle exhausts can go to a certified inspection station for sound testing.

There, the exhaust system would be tested using the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2825 stationary sound testing procedure — “Measurement of Exhaust Sound Pressure Levels of Stationary On-Highway Motorcycles” — which the SAE developed and adopted with support from the Motorcycle Industry Council in May 2009.

Under the SAE J2825 standard, which the AMA has endorsed, decibel limits range from 92 dBA at idle for all motorcycles, to 100 dBA at certain RPMs for various motorcycles, depending on the type of engine. If a motorcycle meets these limits during the certified testing, then it is evidence that the motorcycle doesn’t violate the state’s sound law.

“This new law is good news for responsible motorcyclists who ride in Maine because it provides an objective way to prove that a motorcycle doesn’t violate the state’s sound law, rather than relying on subjective judgments,” said Imre Szauter, AMA government affairs manager. “We applaud the state of Maine — the first in the nation — for adopting the SAE J2825 standard.”

The AMA has long maintained a position of strong opposition to excessive motorcycle sound. The SAE J2825 standard is at the heart of model legislation developed by the AMA for use by jurisdictions seeking a simple, consistent and economical way to deal with sound complaints related to on-highway motorcycles within the larger context of excessive sound from all sources.

For information on the AMA’s model legislation, go tohttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Libraries/Rights_Documents_Other/Model_On_Highway_Sound_Ordinance-1.sflb.ashx

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To see the AMA’s position on excessive motorcycle sound, seehttp://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/PositionStatements/ExcessiveMotorcycleSound.aspx