Ravens Donate Pair of HD’s to New Orleans PD

HD-pOLICE-4First it was a full page ad in the Times-Picayune,thanking the residents of New Orleans for their hospitality.  Then the Baltimore Ravens owner, Steve Bisicotti, purchased a pair of Harley-Davidson FLHP police bikes and donated them to NOPD for the assistance that was given to the team during its stay in the Big Easy.

Typically the police departments in cities that host the Super Bowl provide the visiting teams 24 hour security and police escorts to and from the stadium for team buses.

“We wanted to do something to show our appreciation for how well our team, our families and our fans were treated by everyone representing New Orleans,” Bisciotti said in a statement released by the team.

The bikes were  presented by Ravens Super Bowl star Jacoby Jones, a New Orleans native, during a press conference Wednesday. Mayor Mitch Landrieu and police superintendent Ronal Serpes accepted the gift on behalf of the NOLA PD’s traffic division.

NOPD

Intel’s Tablet Equipped Motorcycle Finds Glass House

Intel’s embedded chopper now rests in a custom-designed display case in Chandler, Arizona

When Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper meet an untimely end on a deserted rural road in the classic 1960s film “Easy Rider,” one of their motorcycles is engulfed in flames as the camera pans skyward. It’s a good thing the Intel Chopper never met the same fate. Unlike the Harley Davidson Hydra-Glides in the film, this one never even saw the road.

It turns out the four motorcycles used in “Easy Rider” were former police bikes purchased at an auction for about $500 in the late ’60s. Having four bikes ensured backups so that shooting for the movie could continue in case one of them failed or was wrecked. One, the famous “Captain America” emblazoned with the American flag paint job, was demolished in the final scene, while the other three were stolen and likely sold off for parts before their significance in movie history was known.

In a bold but also somewhat offbeat move to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Intel’s embedded business in 2007, Intel built a custom-chopper that would make the original “Easy Rider” bikes look like kids’ stuff. After three decades of silicon innovation, the company wanted to celebrate by building a super-bike filled with all the latest innovations. It was sleek, flashy, filled with gadgets, and not very rider-friendly.

Read more @ Intel Newsroom