Celebrating 110 Years With Indian Motorcycle Company at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

Indian Motorcycle’s entire 2012 lineup will be displayed in Sturgis for the 71st annual motorcycle rally.  Indian Motorcycle accessories will also be on display with apparel for purchase. The show truck is located on the corner of 4th and Lazelle Streets in downtown Sturgis

In addition to the events display, Indian Motorcycle is inviting all 1901- 2011 Indian owners to park their motorcycles by the Indian Motorcycle Display to celebrate the 110 years of the company and enjoy the camaraderie of fellow Indian motorcycle owners.  Indian Motorcycle Company is proud to sponsor a breakfast and self-guided ride to the Sturgis half-mile flat track races for all Indian Motorcycle Owners. The ride will start with breakfast at the First Presbyterian Church, located at 1319 Junction Ave, Sturgis, South Dakota 57785 between 9:30am- 10:30am. The ride will leave from downtown Sturgis wind through scenic Spearfish Canyon, ending at the 1/2mile Flat Track Races in Sturgis. Please join us for a fun day of riding and racing. For more information the flat track races visit www.jackpinegypsies.com

 Indian motorcycle is the featured brand at the Knuckle Saloon, located at 931 1st Street in Sturgis . Friday August 12th, starting at 6pm is an Indian gathering. This is open to the public, and we invite Indian Motorcycle owners to show off rides and share some stories.

For more information on the Indian Motorcycle event schedule, dealership locations and openings, the motorcycles, accessories, apparel and gifts visit www.indianmotorcycle.com

 About Polaris

With annual 2010 sales of $1.99 billion, Polaris designs, engineers, manufactures and markets innovative, high quality off-road vehicles (ORVs), including all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and the Polaris RANGER® for recreational and utility use, snowmobiles, motorcycles and on-road electric powered vehicles.

Polaris is a recognized leader in the power sports industry, among the global sales leaders for both snowmobiles and ORVs.  The Company has established a presence in the heavyweight cruiser and touring motorcycle market with Victory motorcycles and the acquisition of the Indian motorcycle brand. Additionally, Polaris continues to invest in the Global on-road low speed vehicle industry with internally developed vehicles and the acquisition of Global Electric Motorcars (GEM).  Polaris enhances the riding experience with a complete line of Pure Polaris apparel, accessories and parts, available at Polaris dealerships.

Polaris Industries Inc. trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “PII”, and the Company is included in the S&P Mid-Cap 400 stock price index.

Information about the complete line of Polaris products, apparel and vehicles accessories are available from authorized Polaris dealers or anytime at www.polarisindustries.com

Two Wheels Safer Than Four

Baltimore:  In research that may surprise off-road riding enthusiasts and safety experts, a Johns Hopkins team has found that crashes involving ATVs — four-wheeled all-terrain vehicles — are significantly more dangerous than crashes involving two-wheeled off-road motorcycles, such as those used in extreme sports like Motocross.

The Results

The research, to be presented at the American College of Surgeons’ 2010 Clinical Congress in Washington, D.C., this week, found that victims of ATV crashes were 50 percent more likely to die of their injuries than similarly injured victims of off-road motorcycle crashes. ATV victims were also 55 percent more likely than injured motorcyclists to be admitted to a hospital’s intensive-care unit and 42 percent more likely to be placed on a ventilator.

“There’s a belief that four wheels must be safer than two,” says Cassandra Villegas, M.P.H., a research fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for Surgery Trials and Outcomes. “But we found the opposite. People involved in ATV crashes are more likely to die or suffer serious trauma.”

The growing popularity of off-road vehicles in the United States has led to a steep rise in the number of injuries resulting from their use. In 2000, Villegas notes, there were 92,200 injuries involving ATVs or off-road motorcycles; in 2007, the last year for which data is available, there were 150,900 injuries. But little rigorous research has been done to determine which vehicles may be riskier than others.

ATVs and off-road motorcycles are designed for recreational use, not use on city streets, and typically are ridden on trails, sand dunes and other rough terrain.

Study Details

In the first study to compare the severity of injuries sustained by ATV versus off-road motorcycle riders, Villegas and senior author Adil H. Haider, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins, reviewed data on nearly 60,000 patients who suffered an injury after a crash involving one of the vehicles between 2002 and 2006.

The researchers say they don’t know why ATV crashes lead to greater injury and mortality, noting they cannot trace the differences solely to helmet use even though 60 percent of motorcyclists were wearing helmets as compared to 30 percent of those in ATV crashes. Even when both types of riders had been wearing helmets, ATV riders still experienced worse injuries and outcomes than motorcyclists, Villegas says. Only a few states have laws requiring the use of a helmet when riding an ATV, says Villegas, and while motorcycle helmet laws are also determined by states, many more have helmet-use laws for motorcycles.

Possible Factors

The researchers say it’s possible that ATV riders wear less protective clothing than off-road motorcyclists when they head out, sometimes little more than shorts and a T-shirt. Another contributing factor could be the significant weight of ATVs, which can cause severe crush injuries when they land atop victims and lead to a greater likelihood of internal organ or extremity damage, Villegas says.

Villegas says that these findings may allow parents, legislators, educators and those in the ATV industry to make better decisions about the use of the off-road vehicles. She also says that studies like these could help ATV manufacturers design and implement increased safety technology in ATVs, similar to how automobile manufacturers have used research to make safer cars and trucks.

Hopkins researchers Stephen M. Bowman, Ph.D.; Eric B. Schneider, Ph.D.; Elliott R. Haut, M.D.; Kent A. Stevens, M.D., M.P.H.; and David T. Efron, M.D., contributed to this study.