Yamaha Recalls 3,900 2013 BOLT Models For Wiring Harness Problem

2014_XVS950CU_BWC1_CA_1_lYamaha Motor Company (Yamaha) is recalling certain model year 2014 XVS950CU (Bolt) motorcycles manufactured March 2013 through June 2013. Slack or sag in the wiring harness may allow it to contact the exhaust manifold causing the wires to melt, and possibly short circuit.  If the wires short circuit, the fuses will blow which may cause the engine to stall. An engine stall while riding, increases the risk of a crash. Yamaha will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the wiring harness and secure it away from the exhaust. If the wiring harness is damaged, it will first be replaced. The recall is expected to begin by the end of July 2013. Owners may contact Yamaha at 1-800-962-7926.Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

Drinking and Riding Is A Good Thing To Do!

Drinking and Riding Is A Good Thing To Do…but only if its water!

You are out riding and your throat is dry and you are thirsty. You need to listen to your body telling you it needs water!

Dehydration is loss of water and important blood salts like potassium and sodium. Vital organs like the kidneys, brain, and heart can’t function properly without a certain amount of water and salt. 

Yes, it can happen to you. Yes it can happen while riding in cold winter months and in the upcoming summer months. 

You many not even realize it is happening to you. Dehydration can cause fatigue, headaches, and lack of focus.  All of these are big safety concerns.

Bikers sometimes avoid drinking too much so as not to interrupt the ride with bathroom stops. I’ve been on a ride and pulled over to drink water and wouldn’t ya know it others appreciated it but they didn’t want to be the one to stop first.  Come on, if you’re riding like that you’re not riding to have fun.  So don’t do that!! Breaks are good and help us to refocus and reenergize on our longer rides.

Some “experts” say that drinking one bottle of water for every two-three hours of riding time is a healthy ratio.

If you think you are dehydrated you can give yourself a pinch test.  On the back of your hand pinch your skin and if it doesn’t go back in place drink some water!!!

Riding a motorcycle isn’t as physical an activity as walking or running.  Being out in the sun, even on a cold winter day, sweating under our protective, cold weather leathers or riding in the heat of the summer sun and with the wind whipping past us can cause dehydration to any of us.

So the moral of this story is to DRINK YOUR WATER, RIDE SAFE AND HAVE FUN!

Safe Rides Always,  Tina – HarleySkyAngel

www.americanwomanriders.com

http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/American-Woman-Riders/112117735473351 

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FUN and SAFETY On The Back Seat

We see so many articles on riding your own motorcycle. I decided to write one for passengers that LOVE TO RIDE.  Riding as a passenger can also be an awesome experience.  FUN and SAFETY are two things that go together when riding a motorcycle. Whether you are the rider on the front seat or a rider on the back seat there are some things you should learn and share with other riders.

The most important piece of advice I want to give you is to only get on the motorcycle of someone that you trust and feel comfortable with.  If you don’t personally know that person ask them if they’ve taken passengers before. NEVER get on a bike of someone impaired with alcohol or drugs.

Do not get on the back seat of the bike until your rider is ready for you otherwise you could catch them off balance and you might find them, yourself  and the bike on the ground. Likewise, do not get off until the rider says its ok.  When sitting on the back always keep your feet on the floorboards.  Once your are on the back seat keep your body in line with the rider.  Follow their lead. When cornering this is important. Do not sit upright when you are in a corner. This will throw off the balance and if the rider isn’t aware of your doing this is could cause an accident. Yours!  Turning your head to face the direction of the turn will normally keep you in the position you need to be in.

Be aware of hot exhaust pipes. Make sure you know where they are and don’t let your leg touch them as you mount or dismount.  Stay alert when you are riding on the back. Be prepared in case the rider needs to swerve or stop suddenly. When the rider puts on the brakes suddenly it will cause a forward weight transfer. Don’t panic. Try to lean back away from the rider. If you slide forward you force the rider forward, possibly reducing their control. It also moves the weight distribution of the motorcycle forward, reducing the weight on the rear tire and its traction making it possible for the back tire to skid.

Communication between the back seat and the front seat riders is very important. This doesn’t mean that you need to have radio communication with each other but it is a good idea to decide how you will communicate with each other if you need to.  On a long ride you will get tired, yes, your butt and legs will start to ache so just tell your rider and pull over somewhere for a short stretch of your legs. If you see a hazard in the road that you don’t think the rider sees point it out to them.  In this article I shared just a few things to be aware of.  As you ride you will come up with your own safety guidelines to keep you and your rider safe.

Be sure to wave at other motorcycle riders! It’s a good thing to do and it just makes you feel good  sharing that riding camaraderie and being a WOMAN THAT LOVES TO RIDE!

Have FUN and ENJOY THE VIEW!  Put SAFETY first so that you can ride again and again discovering all the back roads and beautiful scenery that our country has to share with us.

Tina – HarleySkyAngel

harleyskyangel@comcast.net

American Woman Riders – WE LOVE TO RIDE!

www.americanwomanriders.com

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Find Joy In Your Journey!

 

When the Handlebars Are in Your Hands

Tina Reeves: American Women Riders

I was asked this question this past weeekend: What would I tell new riders to help keep them safe?

Just because you have that motorcycle endorsement and you have that new bike doesn’t mean you know everything. It’s the beginning of your learning to ride process.

You need to take the time to get acquainted with your motorcycle. Learn your controls and location so that it becomes a natural reaction to use them. Adjust the mirrors for you and always remember that even though you use those mirrors always do a head turn check of traffic before changing lanes.

Always keep scanning ahead and keep your eyes moving. Use your defensive riding skills and expect the unexpected. If you are riding in a group don’t follow so close that you can’t avoid trash or potholes in the road.

Something very important when riding is do not panic. Panic overpowers your ability to make decisions and maintain control. I remember the first time I had to brake quickly. First thing that came to my mind was don’t panic. I can do this and that helped stop me from losing control.

Go out on some low traffic streets or find a empty parking lot and practice, practice, practice and practice some more. It can sound intimidating to a new rider but it will all become second nature after you gain experience and confidence. Respect your motorcycle and be proud that you are doing something that will change your life.

Safe Rides Always and Remember To Find Joy In Your Journey!

Tina-HarleySkyAngel
American Woman Riders