Ridiculous Motorcycle Theme Post

When we saw this headline; Teen Mom’ Farrah Abraham Gets Sexy In New Motorcycle-Themed Photo Shoot! We thought, how ridiculous is this.  So we followed the link to Hollywood Life and yes, it was as lame as we thought it would be.

The photographer Jay Ott, is doing a motorcycle themed calendar and we’re assuming that Abraham is supposed to be a “cave” girl paired with the Big Dog Wolf factory custom.  With creativity like that we can’t wait to see what outfit the model will sport while  posing with the Harley-Davidson Fatboy.

Abraham started on the show when she was 16 and pregnant.  She’s 19 now and ready to make the jump from irresponsible and talentless teen mom to talentless adult mom who becomes famous for no other reason than television exposure.

Besides the motorcycle in the photo, the only reason we’re posting it is so you can comment on how lame you think it is, or how much you like it, because someone out there has to like this stuff or it wouldn’t get on the air.

That and it’s a real slow news days so we have to post something so the boss feels he’s getting his money’s worth.

Watch Out! It’s “Pavement Patty” Speed Bump

is it a real child or just "pavement patty?"

Leave it to the Canadians to use an optical illusory speed bump to slow down drivers.  Named “Pavement Patty” the 2D image resembles a child chasing after a ball and the pavement painting appears to rise up as the driver gets closer to it, reaching full 3-D realism at around 100 feet: “Its designers created the image to give drivers who travel at the street’s recommended 18 miles per hour (30 km per hour) enough time to stop before hitting Pavement Patty — acknowledging the spectacle before they continue to safely roll over her.”

The effect is only visual as the entire painting is flat.  Critics warn that drivers will become accustomed to seeing these “children in the street” faux speed bumps and suffer what Scientific America calls “situational blindness.”   Or put another way, like the child who cried wolf too many times, drivers may just start to associate the image of children in the street as something fake, with tragic consequences.

Canada isn’t the first country to use faux speed bumps.  They’re common in Europe, although their effectiveness wears off the longer they remain in one place and drivers become accustomed to them.

In 2008, Philadelphia started using plastic road paintings resembling spikes.